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W. S. Harpole
Iowa State University
92Publications
39H-index
9,838Citations
Publications 94
Newest
#1Lauren G. Shoemaker (UW: University of Wyoming)H-Index: 5
#2Shoemaker Lg (UW: University of Wyoming)
Last.Karen C. Abbott (Case Western Reserve University)H-Index: 15
view all 21 authors...
Stochasticity is a core component of ecology, as it underlies key processes that structure and create variability in nature. Despite its fundamental importance in ecological systems, the concept is often treated as synonymous with unpredictability in community ecology, and studies tend to focus on single forms of stochasticity rather than taking a more holistic view. This has led to multiple narratives for how stochasticity mediates community dynamics. Here, we present a framework that describes...
1 CitationsSource
#1Lotte Korell (MLU: Martin Luther University of Halle-Wittenberg)H-Index: 3
#2Harald Auge (Helmholtz Centre for Environmental Research - UFZ)H-Index: 27
Last.Tiffany M. Knight (MLU: Martin Luther University of Halle-Wittenberg)H-Index: 35
view all 5 authors...
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#1Adam Thomas Clark (Helmholtz Centre for Environmental Research - UFZ)H-Index: 5
#2Helmut HillebrandH-Index: 62
Last.W. S. Harpole (MLU: Martin Luther University of Halle-Wittenberg)H-Index: 39
view all 3 authors...
AbstractIdentifying stable coexistence in empirical systems is notoriously difficult. Here, we show how spatiotemporal structure and complex system dynamics can confound two commonly used stability metrics in empirical contexts: response to perturbation and invasion rate when rare. We use these metrics to characterize stable coexistence across a range of spatial and temporal scales for five simulated models in which the ability of species to coexist in the long term is known a priori and for an ...
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#1Peter Hofmann (Helmholtz Centre for Environmental Research - UFZ)
#2Antonis Chatzinotas (Helmholtz Centre for Environmental Research - UFZ)H-Index: 30
Last.Susanne Dunker (Helmholtz Centre for Environmental Research - UFZ)H-Index: 5
view all 4 authors...
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#1Adam Thomas Clark (Helmholtz Centre for Environmental Research - UFZ)H-Index: 5
#2Kathryn E. Barry (Leipzig University)H-Index: 5
Last.W. S. Harpole (MLU: Martin Luther University of Halle-Wittenberg)H-Index: 39
view all 6 authors...
Source
#1Sophie S. Parker (TNC: The Nature Conservancy)H-Index: 6
#2W. S. Harpole (MLU: Martin Luther University of Halle-Wittenberg)H-Index: 39
Last.Eric W. Seabloom (UMN: University of Minnesota)H-Index: 54
view all 3 authors...
Aims The abundance of a plant species in a diverse community may depend on two aspects of a plant’s resource niche: its ability to garner limiting resources for its own growth, and its ability to reduce resources available for other species. Given that these two aspects of niche can be quantified in monoculture, we tested whether plant growth or plant modification of soil resources in monoculture relate to plant abundance in naturally-assembled California grassland communities.
Source
#1Adam Thomas Clark (Helmholtz Centre for Environmental Research - UFZ)H-Index: 5
#2Lindsay A. Turnbull (University of Oxford)H-Index: 27
Last.Bernhard Schmid (UZH: University of Zurich)H-Index: 9
view all 16 authors...
Models of natural processes necessarily sacrifice some realism for the sake of tractability. Detailed, parameter-rich models often provide accurate estimates of system behaviour but can be data-hungry and difficult to operationalize. Moreover, complexity increases the danger of 'over-fitting', which leads to poor performance when models are applied to novel conditions. This challenge is typically described in terms of a trade-off between bias and variance (i.e. low accuracy vs. low precision). I...
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#1Constantinos Xenophontos (FSU: University of Jena)
#2Martin Taubert (FSU: University of Jena)H-Index: 13
Last.Kirsten Küsel (FSU: University of Jena)H-Index: 36
view all 4 authors...
Biodiversity can have a positive impact on ecosystem functions because greater numbers of species, and their associated genetic and functional differences, can contribute at different times and contexts to overall ecosystem functioning. Quantifying the relative contributions of microbial species to ecosystem functioning is challenging, because many species are believed to be functionally redundant, or their function is not known but inferred by their phylogeny. Here, we used synthetic bacterial ...
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#1Elsa E. Cleland (UCSD: University of California, San Diego)H-Index: 47
#2Eric M. Lind (UMN: University of Minnesota)H-Index: 18
Last.Eric W. Seabloom (UMN: University of Minnesota)H-Index: 54
view all 35 authors...
Anthropogenic activities are increasing nutrient inputs to ecosystems worldwide, with consequences for global carbon and nutrient cycles. Recent meta-analyses show that aboveground primary production is often co-limited by multiple nutrients; however, little is known about how root production responds to changes in nutrient availability. At twenty-nine grassland sites on four continents, we quantified shallow root biomass responses to nitrogen (N), phosphorus (P) and potassium plus micronutrient...
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#1Jennifer Firn (QUT: Queensland University of Technology)H-Index: 28
#2James McGree (QUT: Queensland University of Technology)H-Index: 15
Last.C RischAnita (WSL: Swiss Federal Institute for Forest, Snow and Landscape Research)H-Index: 27
view all 43 authors...
Leaf traits are frequently measured in ecology to provide a ‘common currency’ for predicting how anthropogenic pressures impact ecosystem function. Here, we test whether leaf traits consistently respond to experimental treatments across 27 globally distributed grassland sites across 4 continents. We find that specific leaf area (leaf area per unit mass)—a commonly measured morphological trait inferring shifts between plant growth strategies—did not respond to up to four years of soil nutrient ad...
6 CitationsSource
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