Match!
Tiziana Casciaro
University of Toronto
43Publications
16H-index
1,906Citations
Publications 43
Newest
#1Marissa King (Yale University)H-Index: 15
#2Ronald S. Burt (U of C: University of Chicago)H-Index: 54
view all 5 authors...
Source
#1Amy C. EdmondsonH-Index: 47
#2Tiziana CasciaroH-Index: 16
view all 3 authors...
#1H. Colleen StuartH-Index: 3
Last.Tiziana CasciaroH-Index: 16
view all 3 authors...
Abstract This chapter examines the implications of career achievement for divorce, and whether they differ for men and women. Consistent with theory suggesting that women’s workplace achievement violates traditional expectations of gender and marriage, therefore creating domestic strain, the authors predict that career achievement is associated with a greater risk of divorce for women, but not for men. Using data from the Academy Awards, the authors find that for women, a sudden shift in achieve...
Source
#1Tiziana CasciaroH-Index: 16
#2Francesca GinoH-Index: 51
Last.Maryam KouchakiH-Index: 14
view all 3 authors...
#1Tiziana CasciaroH-Index: 16
#2Francesca GinoH-Index: 51
Last.Maryam KouchakiH-Index: 14
view all 3 authors...
Letters to the editor are presented in response to a letter from the May 2016 issue by Tiziana Casciaro, Francesca Gino, and Maryam Kouchaki on business networking.
#1Inga CarboniH-Index: 7
#2Tiziana CasciaroH-Index: 16
Research on sociometric status among youth and adolescents offers a new framework within which to explore outcomes for individuals who are at the center of conflict in the groups and organizations to which they belong. In particular, individuals who are both well-liked and disliked—so-called controversials—may occupy a unique and previously unrecognized role in organizational life. In this chapter, we explore controversial sociometric status. Drawing mainly upon psychological and organizational ...
2 CitationsSource
#1Tiziana Casciaro (U of T: University of Toronto)H-Index: 16
#2Francesca Gino (Harvard University)H-Index: 51
Last.Maryam KouchakiH-Index: 14
view all 3 authors...
“I hate networking.” It’s a familiar refrain. But in today’s world, networking is a necessity—and fortunately, an aversion to it can be overcome. Drawing on laboratory experiments and on studies at a large law firm, the authors have identified four strategies that can help people become more excited about and effective at building relationships: • Focus on learning. Adopt a “promotion mindset” and concentrate on the positives, and you’re more likely to perceive networking as an opportunity for d...
1 Citations
#1Tiziana Casciaro (U of T: University of Toronto)H-Index: 16
#2Sigal G. Barsade (UPenn: University of Pennsylvania)H-Index: 22
Last.Giuseppe Labianca (UK: University of Kentucky)H-Index: 22
view all 6 authors...
Although multiple disciplines have been applied to the study of organizations, organizational research is rarely interdisciplinary in the sense of two or more disciplines being linked in the joint analysis of organizational phenomena. The articles in this special issue illustrate the kinds of insights that can be gained by moving from a purely disciplinary perspective on organizational behavior to an interdisciplinary perspective that considers network phenomena and psychological phenomena as in...
20 CitationsSource
#1Tiziana Casciaro (U of T: University of Toronto)H-Index: 16
#2Miguel Sousa Lobo (Ad: INSEAD)H-Index: 11
To better understand the role of affect in organizational task-related networks, we developed a theory of affective primacy that identifies cognitive and motivational mechanisms through which the affective value of a social relationship a feeling of positive affect from interactions with a colleague operates as an antecedent of perceived instrumental value a subjective evaluation of a relationship's contribution to accomplishing assigned tasks. We tested this theory with full-network data collec...
24 CitationsSource
#1Tiziana Casciaro (U of T: University of Toronto)H-Index: 16
#2Francesca Gino (Harvard University)H-Index: 51
Last.Maryam Kouchaki (NU: Northwestern University)H-Index: 14
view all 3 authors...
To create social ties to support their professional or personal goals, people actively engage in instrumental networking. Drawing from moral psychology research, we posit that this intentional behavior has unintended consequences for an individual’s morality. Unlike personal networking in pursuit of emotional support or friendship, and unlike social ties that emerge spontaneously, instrumental networking in pursuit of professional goals can impinge on an individual’s moral purity — a psychologic...
45 CitationsSource
12345