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David A. Grimaldi
American Museum of Natural History
234Publications
40H-index
7,803Citations
Publications 234
Newest
Published on Feb 27, 2019in Ecological Entomology 2.24
Tobias Policha2
Estimated H-index: 2
(University of Oregon),
David A. Grimaldi40
Estimated H-index: 40
(American Museum of Natural History)
+ 4 AuthorsBitty A. Roy12
Estimated H-index: 12
(University of Oregon)
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Published on Feb 12, 2019in American Museum Novitates 0.98
Hollister W. Herhold1
Estimated H-index: 1
(American Museum of Natural History),
Steven R. Davis14
Estimated H-index: 14
(American Museum of Natural History)
+ 2 AuthorsDavid A. Grimaldi40
Estimated H-index: 40
(American Museum of Natural History)
Bees of the family Halictidae (Apoidea: Anthophila) have three pairs of thick, bundled muscles that are circular to subcircular in cross section within the first metasomal segment, as revealed by micro-CT scanning of 16 species in 15 genera of five bee families. In nonhalictids and the basal halictid subfamily Rophitinae, these muscles are planar (flat and sheetlike), typically lying between the anterior air sacs and abdominal wall. In Nomiinae and Halictinae, these muscles, especially the dorsa...
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Published on Dec 1, 2018in Nature Communications 12.35
Enrique Peñalver17
Estimated H-index: 17
(Instituto Geológico y Minero de España),
Antonio Arillo15
Estimated H-index: 15
(Complutense University of Madrid)
+ 5 AuthorsRicardo Pérez-de la Fuente10
Estimated H-index: 10
(University of Oxford)
The originally published version of this Article was updated shortly after publication to add the word ‘Ticks’ to the title, following its inadvertent removal during the production process. This has now been corrected in both the PDF and HTML versions of the Article.
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Published on Dec 1, 2018
Brian V. Brown14
Estimated H-index: 14
(Natural History Museum of Los Angeles County),
Art Borkent14
Estimated H-index: 14
(American Museum of Natural History)
+ 57 AuthorsZelia L. Burington1
Estimated H-index: 1
(Wright State University)
Estimations of tropical insect diversity generally suffer from lack of known groups or faunas against which extrapolations can be made, and have seriously underestimated the diversity of some taxa. Here we report the intensive inventory of a four-hectare tropical cloud forest in Costa Rica for one year, which yielded 4332 species of Diptera, providing the first verifiable basis for diversity of a major group of insects at a single site in the tropics. In total 73 families were present, all of wh...
5 Citations Source Cite
David A. Grimaldi40
Estimated H-index: 40
(American Museum of Natural History)
Diverse new basal (aschizan) Cyclorrhapha fossilized in amber are described from the Tertiary and Cretaceous, and their relationships are examined with character-based phylogenetic hypotheses for each family or family group. There are 18 new species in 15 genera (11 of them new) and four families plus the Syrphoidea. Fossils are from the Early Cretaceous of Lebanon, Late Cretaceous of New Jersey (United States) and Alberta (Canada), Eocene of the eastern Baltic coast, and Miocene of the Dominica...
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Published on Oct 9, 2018in American Museum Novitates 0.98
David A. Grimaldi40
Estimated H-index: 40
(American Museum of Natural History)
ABSTRACT The genus Litoleptis has consisted of nine described species, seven of them Asian and only two in the New World: L. alaskensis Chillcott, known from two specimens from northwest Alaska, and L. chilensis Hennig, known from a male specimen from near Santiago, Chile. A third New World species is described here, Litoleptis tico, n. sp., based on a single female from Costa Rica. The species is unique for the genus in having a vestigial proboscis and lacking spermathecal accessory ducts and g...
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Published on Sep 28, 2018in American Museum Novitates 0.98
David A. Grimaldi40
Estimated H-index: 40
(American Museum of Natural History),
Georgene A. Aaroe (Lafayette College)+ 7 AuthorsChristopher J. Williams23
Estimated H-index: 23
(Franklin & Marshall College)
ABSTRACT The Chickaloon Formation in south-central Alaska contains rich coal deposits dated very close to the Paleocene-Eocene boundary, immediately beneath which occur dispersed nodules of amber along with abundant remains of Metasequoia, dicots, and monocots. The nodules are small (less than 10 mm in length), nearly 10,000 of which were screened, yielding several inclusions of fungi and plant fragments, but mostly terrestrial arthropods: 29 specimens in 10 orders and 13 families. The fungi inc...
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Published on Aug 1, 2018in American Journal of Botany 2.79
Maria A. Gandolfo26
Estimated H-index: 26
(Cornell University),
Kevin C. Nixon39
Estimated H-index: 39
(Cornell University)
+ 1 AuthorsDavid A. Grimaldi40
Estimated H-index: 40
(American Museum of Natural History)
3 Citations Source Cite
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