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Rick Schulting
University of Oxford
Radiocarbon datingGeologyMesolithicArchaeologyGeography
139Publications
23H-index
1,910Citations
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Publications 148
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#1Chelsea Budd (Umeå University)
#1Chelsea BuddH-Index: 3
Last. Malcolm Lillie (Umeå University)
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Barcin Hoyuk is one of the oldest Neolithic settlement sites in northwest Anatolia, with early layers of occupation radiocarbon dated to ca.6600 cal BC. The Neolithic phase at the site (ca.6600 – ...
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#1Christophe SnoeckH-Index: 3
Last. Rick Schulting (University of Oxford)H-Index: 23
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Abstract Strontium isotopes are used in archaeology, ecology, forensics, and other disciplines to study the origin of artefacts, humans, animals and food items. Strontium in animal and human tissues such as bone and teeth originates from food and drink consumed during life, leaving an isotopic signal corresponding to their geographical origin (i.e. where the plants grew, the animals grazed and the drinking water passed through). To contextualise the measurements obtained directly on animal and h...
2 CitationsSource
#1Christophe SnoeckH-Index: 9
Last. Rick Schulting (University of Oxford)H-Index: 23
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Abstract This paper presents the results of a study using strontium, oxygen and carbon isotopes, strontium concentrations, infrared analyses and radiocarbon dating to investigate human mobility and landscape use as seen in individuals from the Neolithic court tomb of Parknabinnia, Co. Clare, Ireland. Taking advantage of the recent demonstration that it is possible to obtain reliable in vivo strontium isotope signals from calcined bone, we compare measurements on cremated bone (n = 4) and uncrema...
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#1Martin J. SmithH-Index: 15
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#1Martin J. SmithH-Index: 15
#2Rick SchultingH-Index: 23
Last. Linda FibigerH-Index: 7
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#1Teresa Fernández-Crespo (University of Oxford)H-Index: 4
#2Christophe Snoeck (Vrije Universiteit Brussel)H-Index: 9
Last. Rick Schulting (University of Oxford)H-Index: 23
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The coexistence of cultural identities and their interaction is a fundamental topic of social sciences that is not easily addressed in prehistory. Differences in mortuary treatment can help approach this issue. Here, we present a multi-isotope study to track both diet and mobility through the life histories of 32 broadly coeval Late Neolithic individuals interred in caves and in megalithic graves of a restricted region of northern Iberia. The results show significant differences in infant- and c...
1 CitationsSource
#1Teresa Fernández-Crespo (University of Oxford)H-Index: 4
#2Javier OrdoñoH-Index: 2
Last. Rick Schulting (University of Oxford)H-Index: 23
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Abstract Excavations at the Iron Age settlement of La Hoya in north-central Iberia, which was attacked between the mid-4th and the late 3rd centuries BC, provided fossilized scenes of devastation and death but also an extraordinary opportunity to analyze lifeways. Here, we conduct stable carbon and nitrogen isotope analyses of human, animal and plant remains to reconstruct aspects of subsistence. The results indicate a mainly C3-based subsistence economy, focused on the cultivation of cereals an...
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#1Francisca Santana-Sagredo (University of Oxford)H-Index: 5
#2Julia A. Lee-Thorp (University of Oxford)H-Index: 54
Last. Mauricio Uribe Rodríguez (University of Chile)H-Index: 12
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Abstract Research on the Late Intermediate Period (AD 900–1450) in northern Chile has been strongly influenced by two mobility models: John Murra's classic vertical ecological archipelago model, with highland colonies in the lowlands; and the gyratory mobility model, with pastoralists and their llama caravans controlling trade. The widespread application of these two models, however, suffers from a lack of supporting archaeological evidence. Stable isotope analysis provides a more direct approac...
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#1Niels J. de Winter (Vrije Universiteit Brussel)H-Index: 3
#2Christophe Snoeck (Vrije Universiteit Brussel)H-Index: 9
Last. Philippe Claeys (Vrije Universiteit Brussel)H-Index: 31
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Abstract High resolution in situ trace element μXRF maps and profiles were measured on the enamel exposed in cross sections through archaeological human permanent molars from seven Late Neolithic/Early Chalcolithic funerary caves and megalithic graves of north-central Iberia. Changes in concentrations of Fe, Zn and Sr in inward direction into the enamel shed light on diagenetic and endogenous trace element concentrations in archaeological tooth enamel. Most of these profiles resemble sigmoid-sha...
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#1Teresa Fernández-Crespo (University of Oxford)H-Index: 4
#2Rick Schulting (University of Oxford)H-Index: 23
Last. Pablo Arias (UC: University of Cantabria)H-Index: 10
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Stable carbon and nitrogen isotope research on past populations in the Iberian Neolithic has emphasized the Atlantic and Mediterranean coasts. This study provides the first isotopic insights into the diet and subsistence economy of Early and Middle Neolithic populations from open-air sites in interior north-central Iberia. We present bone collagen carbon (δ13C) and nitrogen (δ15N) isotope ratios for 44 humans and 33 animals recovered from six cemeteries of the Ebro valley and the northern Iberia...
1 CitationsSource
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