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Luis M. Chiappe
Natural History Museum of Los Angeles County
183Publications
47H-index
6,074Citations
Publications 183
Newest
#1Lida Xing (China University of Geosciences)H-Index: 19
#2Ryan C. McKellar (KU: University of Kansas)H-Index: 13
Last.Luis M. Chiappe (Natural History Museum of Los Angeles County)H-Index: 47
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Over the last three years, Burmese amber (~99 Ma, from Myanmar) has provided a series of immature enantiornithine skeletal remains preserved in varying developmental stages and degrees of completeness. These specimens have improved our knowledge based on compression fossils in Cretaceous sedimentary rocks, adding details of three-dimensional structure and soft tissues that are rarely preserved elsewhere. Here we describe a remarkably well-preserved foot, accompanied by part of the wing plumage. ...
3 CitationsSource
#1Luis M. Chiappe (Natural History Museum of Los Angeles County)H-Index: 47
#2Meng Qingjin (AMNH: American Museum of Natural History)H-Index: 6
Last.Liu Di (AMNH: American Museum of Natural History)H-Index: 2
view all 7 authors...
Source
#1Lida Xing (China University of Geosciences)H-Index: 19
#2Jingmai K. O’Connor (CAS: Chinese Academy of Sciences)H-Index: 26
Last.Fuming Lei (CAS: Chinese Academy of Sciences)
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Summary Recent discoveries of vertebrate remains trapped in middle Cretaceous amber from northern Myanmar [ 1 , 2 ] have provided insights into the morphology of soft-tissue structures in extinct animals [ 3 , 4 , 5 , 6 , 7 ], in particular, into the evolution and paleobiology of early birds [ 4 , 8 , 9 ]. So far, five bird specimens have been described from Burmese amber: two isolated wings, an isolated foot with wing fragment, and two partial skeletons [ 4 , 8 , 9 , 10 ]. Most of these specime...
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#1Di Liu (AMNH: American Museum of Natural History)H-Index: 5
#2Luis M. Chiappe (Natural History Museum of Los Angeles County)H-Index: 47
Last.Qingjin Meng (AMNH: American Museum of Natural History)H-Index: 17
view all 5 authors...
We describe two nearly complete enantiornithine skeletons from the Lower Cretaceous Huajiying Formation (ca. 130.7 Ma) of northern Hebei province, China. Many morphological features indicate that these specimens represent a new taxon, here named Orienantius ritteri gen. et sp.. nov. The new fossils preserve their plumage as well as rare information about their soft tissues, including the wing’s patagia. Multivariate analyses of their skeleton and flight feathers provide insight into the aerodyna...
1 CitationsSource
#1Francisco Serrano (UMA: University of Málaga)H-Index: 3
#2Luis M. Chiappe (Natural History Museum of Los Angeles County)H-Index: 47
Last.José Luis Sanz (UAM: Autonomous University of Madrid)H-Index: 30
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Abstract Atmospheric conditions are critical for a range of biological functions—locomotion among others—and long-term changes in these conditions have been identified as causal for different macroevolutionary patterns. Here we examine the influence of variations in atmospheric O2 concentration (AOC), temperature (Tair), and air density (ρair) on the power efficiency, as it relates to locomotion, during the evolutionary history of birds. Specifically, our study centers on four key evolutionary e...
1 CitationsSource
#1Fabien Knoll (University of Manchester)H-Index: 16
#2Luis M. Chiappe (Natural History Museum of Los Angeles County)H-Index: 47
Last.José Luis Sanz (UAM: Autonomous University of Madrid)H-Index: 30
view all 14 authors...
Fossils of juvenile Mesozoic birds provide insight into the early evolution of avian development, however such fossils are rare. The analysis of the ossification sequence in these early-branching birds has the potential to address important questions about their comparative developmental biology and to help understand their morphological evolution and ecological differentiation. Here we report on an early juvenile enantiornithine specimen from the Early Cretaceous of Europe, which sheds new ligh...
4 CitationsSource
#1Francisco Serrano (UMA: University of Málaga)H-Index: 3
#2Luis M. Chiappe (Natural History Museum of Los Angeles County)H-Index: 47
Last.José Luis Sanz (UAM: Autonomous University of Madrid)H-Index: 30
view all 6 authors...
Intermittent flight through flap-gliding (alternating flapping phases and gliding phases with spread wings) or bounding (flapping and ballistic phases with wings folded against the body) are strategies to optimize aerial efficiency which are commonly used among small birds today. The broad morphological disparity of Mesozoic birds suggests that a range of aerial strategies could have evolved early in avian evolution. Based on biomechanics and aerodynamic theory, this study reconstructs the fligh...
3 CitationsSource
#1Lida Xing (China University of Geosciences)H-Index: 19
#2Jingmai K. O’Connor (CAS: Chinese Academy of Sciences)H-Index: 26
Last.LIGang (CAS: Chinese Academy of Sciences)H-Index: 16
view all 10 authors...
Cretaceous amber from Myanmar (∼99 Ma Burmese amber) has become a valuable supplement to the traditional skeletal record of small theropod dinosaurs preserved in sedimentary rocks, particularly for coelurosaurs and enantiornithines. The specimens recovered from this deposit preserve skeletal material and soft tissues in unmatched detail. This provides opportunities to study three-dimensional preservation of soft tissues, microstructure, and pigmentation patterns that are seldom available elsewhe...
9 CitationsSource
#1Guillermo Navalón (UoB: University of Bristol)H-Index: 2
#2Qingjin Meng (AMNH: American Museum of Natural History)H-Index: 17
Last.Luis M. Chiappe (Natural History Museum of Los Angeles County)H-Index: 47
view all 8 authors...
Abstract The Huajiying Formation contains the earliest deposits of the Jehol Biota, representing the world’s second oldest avifauna. This avifauna includes the early confuciusornithid Eoconfuciusornis zhengi , the oldest occurrence of this clade and one of the earliest divergences of pygostylian birds. Although E. zhengi shows unique traits, the holotype’s immature age makes comparisons with the better known Confuciusornis sanctus problematic. As a result, the taxonomic validity of E. zhengi is ...
1 CitationsSource
#1Alyssa Bell (Natural History Museum of Los Angeles County)H-Index: 5
#2Yun-Hsin Wu (SC: University of Southern California)
Last.Luis M. Chiappe (Natural History Museum of Los Angeles County)H-Index: 47
view all 3 authors...
Abstract The Cretaceous Hesperornithiformes are an extinct group of aquatic birds long recognized to have practiced foot-propelled diving. This specialization is seen today in a number of modern avian families (loons, grebes, cormorants, and some ducks) that have convergently derived a diving lifestyle. Historically, hesperornithiforms have usually been compared to modern loons and grebes as analogues. However, these comparisons are based on qualitative observations of skeletal morphology and ha...
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