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Markus Jachtenfuchs
Hertie School of Governance
20Publications
8H-index
220Citations
Publications 21
Newest
#1Björn Bremer (MPG: Max Planck Society)H-Index: 1
#2Philipp Genschel (EUI: European University Institute)H-Index: 19
Last.Markus Jachtenfuchs (Hertie School of Governance)H-Index: 8
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#1Philipp Genschel (EUI: European University Institute)H-Index: 19
The Eurozone crisis and the refugee crisis are showcases of the problems associated with the EU’s shift from market integration to the integration of core state powers. The integration of core state powers responds to similar functional demand factors as market integration (interdependence, externalities and spill-over) but its supply is more tightly constrained by a high propensity for zero-sum conflict, a functional requirement for centralized fiscal, coercive and administrative capacities, an...
22 CitationsSource
#1John Erik Fossum (University of Oslo)H-Index: 16
#2Markus Jachtenfuchs (Hertie School of Governance)H-Index: 8
ABSTRACTThe purpose of this collection is to discuss what we may learn from thinking about the EU in federal terms. Our point of departure is that this represents a two-fold challenge. It is on the one hand a matter of establishing ‘how federal’ the EU is (the EU’s federal challenge). On the other, the EU has federal features but is not a state; thus raises the question of whether federal theory and practice may have to be adapted to take proper account of the EU (the EU’s challenge to federalis...
11 CitationsSource
#1Markus Jachtenfuchs (Hertie School of Governance)H-Index: 8
#2Christiane Kasack (Hertie School of Governance)H-Index: 1
ABSTRACTWe argue that there is a commonality between federal states and the EU: both face a dilemma between sub-unit autonomy and collective problem-solving. We develop the structure of this dilemma, which is pervasive in multilevel systems with a strong element of shared policy-making and most pronounced in the EU. While a substantial part of the federalism literature considers this relationship as precarious and discusses ways to stabilize it, we propose an analytical perspective which focuses...
8 CitationsSource
#1Philipp Genschel (EUI: European University Institute)H-Index: 19
#2Markus Jachtenfuchs (Hertie School of Governance)H-Index: 8
ABSTRACTWe map the pattern and extent of the European integration of core state powers (coercive force, public finance and public administration) and analyse causes and consequences. We highlight two findings: First, in contrast to historical examples of federal state-building, where the nationalization of core state powers precipitated the institutional, territorial and political consolidation of the emerging state, the European integration of core state powers is associated with the institutio...
50 CitationsSource
#1Philipp GenschelH-Index: 19
5 CitationsSource
#1Philipp GenschelH-Index: 19
The literature on European integration has its own business cycles. In the 2000s, the common wisdom was that the Maastricht Treaty had ushered the EU into a stable constitutional equilibrium that was unlikely to be upset soon (Hix 2007: 143–44; Moravcsik 2005: 349). In the 2010s, by contrast, the common wisdom holds that Maastricht has unleashed new dynamics of change that transform the institutional architecture of the EU in significant ways. Some scholars diagnose the rise of a ‘new intergover...
#1Philipp GenschelH-Index: 19
10 Citations
#1Philipp GenschelH-Index: 19
1 Citations
#1Philipp GenschelH-Index: 19
PART I. MILITARY SECURITY PART II. FISCAL AND MONETARY POLICY PART III. PUBLIC ADMINISTRATION PART IV. CROSS-CUTTING PERSPECTIVES
47 Citations
123