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Katherine M. Flegal
Centers for Disease Control and Prevention
178Publications
83H-index
104kCitations
Publications 178
Newest
Published on Jan 1, 2017
James L. Pirkle47
Estimated H-index: 47
,
Katherine M. Flegal83
Estimated H-index: 83
+ 3 AuthorsKurt R. Maurer11
Estimated H-index: 11
101 Citations
Published on Sep 27, 2016in JAMA 47.66
Katherine M. Flegal83
Estimated H-index: 83
(CDC: Centers for Disease Control and Prevention),
Cynthia L. Ogden55
Estimated H-index: 55
(CDC: Centers for Disease Control and Prevention)
1 Citations Source Cite
Published on Jun 7, 2016in JAMA 47.66
Cynthia L. Ogden55
Estimated H-index: 55
(CDC: Centers for Disease Control and Prevention),
Margaret D. Carroll54
Estimated H-index: 54
(CDC: Centers for Disease Control and Prevention)
+ 4 AuthorsKatherine M. Flegal83
Estimated H-index: 83
(CDC: Centers for Disease Control and Prevention)
Importance Previous analyses of obesity trends among children and adolescents showed an increase between 1988-1994 and 1999-2000, but no change between 2003-2004 and 2011-2012, except for a significant decline among children aged 2 to 5 years. Objectives To provide estimates of obesity and extreme obesity prevalence for children and adolescents for 2011-2014 and investigate trends by age between 1988-1994 and 2013-2014. Design, Setting, and Participants Children and adolescents aged 2 to 19 year...
806 Citations Source Cite
Published on Jun 7, 2016in JAMA 47.66
Katherine M. Flegal83
Estimated H-index: 83
(CDC: Centers for Disease Control and Prevention),
Deanna Kruszon-Moran33
Estimated H-index: 33
(CDC: Centers for Disease Control and Prevention)
+ 2 AuthorsCynthia L. Ogden55
Estimated H-index: 55
(CDC: Centers for Disease Control and Prevention)
Importance Between 1980 and 2000, the prevalence of obesity increased significantly among adult men and women in the United States; further significant increases were observed through 2003-2004 for men but not women. Subsequent comparisons of data from 2003-2004 with data through 2011-2012 showed no significant increases for men or women. Objective To examine obesity prevalence for 2013-2014 and trends over the decade from 2005 through 2014 adjusting for sex, age, race/Hispanic origin, smoking s...
955 Citations Source Cite
Published on Jan 1, 2016in Medicine 2.03
Yutaka Aoki1
Estimated H-index: 1
,
Debra J. Brody24
Estimated H-index: 24
+ 3 AuthorsJennifer D. Parker1
Estimated H-index: 1
Analyses of the Third National Health and Nutrition Examination Survey (NHANES III) in 1988 to 1994 found an association of increasing blood lead levels <10 μg/dL with a higher risk of cardiovascular disease (CVD) mortality. The potential need to correct blood lead for hematocrit/hemoglobin and adjust for biomarkers for other metals, for example, cadmium and iron, had not been addressed in the previous NHANES III-based studies on blood lead-CVD mortality association. We analyzed 1999 to 2010 NHA...
14 Citations Source Cite
Published on Nov 1, 2015in NCHS data brief
Cynthia L. Ogden55
Estimated H-index: 55
,
Carroll4
Estimated H-index: 4
+ 1 AuthorsKatherine M. Flegal83
Estimated H-index: 83
Obesity is associated with health risks (1,2). Monitoring the prevalence of obesity is relevant for public health programs that focus on reducing or preventing obesity. No significant changes were seen in either adult or childhood obesity prevalence in the United States between 2003-2004 and 2011-2012 (3). This report provides the most recent national data on obesity prevalence by sex, age, and race and Hispanic origin, using data for 2011- 2014. Overall prevalence estimates from 1999-2000 throu...
401 Citations
Published on Mar 1, 2015in Annals of Epidemiology 2.80
Katherine M. Flegal83
Estimated H-index: 83
(CDC: Centers for Disease Control and Prevention),
Orestis A. Panagiotou15
Estimated H-index: 15
,
Barry I. Graubard75
Estimated H-index: 75
Abstract Purpose Obesity is a highly prevalent condition in the United States and elsewhere and is associated with increased mortality and morbidity. Here, we discuss some issues involved in quantifying the health burden of obesity using population attributable fraction (PAF) estimates and provide examples. Methods We searched PubMed for articles reporting attributable fraction estimates for obesity. We reviewed eligible articles to identify methodological concerns and tabulated illustrative exa...
37 Citations Source Cite
Published on Dec 1, 2014in American Journal of Epidemiology 4.32
Katherine M. Flegal83
Estimated H-index: 83
(CDC: Centers for Disease Control and Prevention),
Brian K. Kit18
Estimated H-index: 18
(CDC: Centers for Disease Control and Prevention),
Barry I. Graubard75
Estimated H-index: 75
We thank Dr. Stevens for her observations (1). We agree with Stevens that standardized body mass index (BMI; weight (kg)/height (m)2) cutpoints can aid comparisons among studies examining different populations. The standard BMI cutpoints of 18.5, 25, and 30, indicating underweight (<18.5), normal weight (18.5–<25), overweight (25–<30), and obesity (≥30), were developed by the National Heart, Lung, and Blood Institute (2) and the World Health Organization (WHO) (3) and were reiterated in the 2013...
Source Cite
Published on Nov 1, 2014in Epidemiology 4.99
Katherine M. Flegal83
Estimated H-index: 83
Studies of weight and mortality sometimes state that the mortality relative risks for obesity from non-smokers are valid estimates of the relative risks for obesity in both smokers and non-smokers. Extending this idea, several influential articles have used relative risks for obesity from non-smokers and attributable fraction methods for unadjusted risks to estimate attributable fractions of deaths in the entire population (smokers and non-smokers combined). However, stratification by smoking is...
2 Citations Source Cite
Published on Aug 1, 2014in American Journal of Epidemiology 4.32
Katherine M. Flegal83
Estimated H-index: 83
,
Brian K. Kit9
Estimated H-index: 9
,
Barry I. Graubard75
Estimated H-index: 75
The Strengthening the Reporting of Observational Studies in Epidemiology (STROBE) Initiative used an iterative process of consultation and revision to develop recommendations on what should be included in an accurate and complete report of an observational study, taking into account empirical evidence and methodological considerations (1). One of the recommendations of the resultant STROBE Statement is that investigators “explain how quantitative variables were handled in the analyses. If applic...
41 Citations Source Cite
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