John Walsii
944Publications
25H-index
6,984Citations
Publications 944
Newest
Published on Mar 1, 2019in Research Policy 4.66
John Walsii25
Estimated H-index: 25
(Georgia Institute of Technology),
You-Na Lee5
Estimated H-index: 5
(National University of Singapore),
Li Tang13
Estimated H-index: 13
(Fudan University)
Abstract Science is increasingly a team activity, and the size of the teams has been growing. At the same time, there are concerns about an increasing rate of pathologies in science. The growth of team science suggests the need to look beyond individual-level explanations and focus on organizational structures and institutional contexts to explain pathologies in science. Drawing on the literature on organizational pathologies, we argue that division of labor may be a key factor contributing to p...
Source Cite
Published on Mar 1, 2019in Research Policy 4.66
Mario Biagioli14
Estimated H-index: 14
(University of California, Davis),
Martin Kenney16
Estimated H-index: 16
(University of California, Davis)
+ 1 AuthorsJohn Walsii25
Estimated H-index: 25
(Georgia Institute of Technology)
The motivation for this Special Issue is increasing concern not only with academic misconduct but also with less easily defined forms of misrepresentation and gaming. In an era of intense emphasis on measuring academic performance, there has been a proliferation of scandals, questionable behaviors and devious stratagems involving not just individuals but also organizations, including universities, editors and reviewers, journal publishers, and conference organizers. This introduction first revie...
Source Cite
Published on Jul 1, 2018in Research Policy 4.66
Jian Wang11
Estimated H-index: 11
(Leiden University),
You-Na Lee5
Estimated H-index: 5
(National University of Singapore),
John Walsii25
Estimated H-index: 25
(Georgia Institute of Technology)
In many countries the scientific funding system is shifting from an internal block funding model toward a competitive project funding model. However, there is growing concern that the competitive project funding system favors relatively safe, conventional projects at the expense of risky, novel research. It is important to assess different funding models in order to design better funding systems for science. This paper empirically tests for differences in the novelty of funded outputs between in...
3 Citations Source Cite
Staša Milojević16
Estimated H-index: 16
(Indiana University),
Filippo Radicchi27
Estimated H-index: 27
(Indiana University),
John Walsii25
Estimated H-index: 25
(Georgia Institute of Technology)
Contemporary science has been characterized by an exponential growth in publications and a rise of team science. At the same time, there has been an increase in the number of awarded PhD degrees, which has not been accompanied by a similar expansion in the number of academic positions. In such a competitive environment, an important measure of academic success is the ability to maintain a long active career in science. In this paper, we study workforce trends in three scientific disciplines over...
4 Citations Source Cite
Published on Sep 1, 2017in Science, Technology, & Human Values 2.94
Sahra Jabbehdari1
Estimated H-index: 1
,
John Walsii25
Estimated H-index: 25
(Georgia Institute of Technology)
Scientific authorship has become a contested terrain in contemporary science. Based on a survey of authors across fields, we measure the likelihood of specialist authors (sometimes called “guest” authors): people who only made specialized contributions, such as data, materials, or funding; and “nonauthor collaborators” (sometimes referred to as “ghost” authors): those who did significant work on the project but do not appear as authors, across different research contexts, including field, size o...
11 Citations Source Cite
Published on Oct 1, 2016in Research Policy 4.66
John Walsii25
Estimated H-index: 25
(Georgia Institute of Technology),
You-Na Lee5
Estimated H-index: 5
(Georgia Institute of Technology),
Sadao Nagaoka8
Estimated H-index: 8
(Tokyo Keizai University)
Much current work in management of innovation argues that it is becoming increasingly necessary for inventors and their firms to exploit information and capabilities outside the firm in order to combine one’s own resources with resources from the external environment. Building on this prior work, we examine the relationship between collaboration and innovation. Using detailed information on a sample of triadic patents, with over 1900 responses in the US, we report on the rates of collaboration o...
18 Citations Source Cite
Published on Jul 1, 2016in Research Policy 4.66
Ashish Arora36
Estimated H-index: 36
(Duke University),
Wesley M. Cohen26
Estimated H-index: 26
(Duke University),
John Walsii25
Estimated H-index: 25
(Georgia Institute of Technology)
Recent accounts suggest the development and commercialization of invention has become more “open.” Greater division of labor between inventors and innovators can enhance social welfare through gains from trade and economies of specialization. Moreover, this extensive reliance upon outside sources for invention also suggests that understanding the factors that condition the extramural supply of inventions to innovators is crucial to understanding the determinants of the rate and direction of inno...
41 Citations Source Cite
Published on Sep 1, 2016in Research Policy 4.66
John Walsii25
Estimated H-index: 25
(Georgia Institute of Technology),
You-Na Lee5
Estimated H-index: 5
(Georgia Institute of Technology),
Taehyun Jung4
Estimated H-index: 4
(Hanyang University)
Using information from a survey of US inventors, this study explores the reasons for patent non-use and different types of non-use at the patent level, and how this varies by industry and firm characteristics. We find that 55% of triadic patents are commercialized. We also find that 17% of all triadic patents are not commercialized but are at least partially for preemption, though only 3% of all triadic patents are purely preemptive patents. We find that preemptive non-use is less common than fa...
12 Citations Source Cite
Published on Feb 1, 2016in Research Policy 4.66
You-Na Lee5
Estimated H-index: 5
(Georgia Institute of Technology),
John Walsii25
Estimated H-index: 25
(Georgia Institute of Technology)
“Intuition, judgment, creativity are basically expressions of capabilities for recognition and response based upon experience and knowledge (p. 128–129)” (Simon, 1997). Workers gain experience and knowledge in the course of their normal jobs. Therefore, innovative ideas can be generated from knowledge built from learning opportunities across the firm (not just the R&D lab). Employees working for different functions (R&D and outside of R&D) in an organization have different work practices and bui...
16 Citations Source Cite
Published on Apr 1, 2015in Research Policy 4.66
Sotaro Shibayama8
Estimated H-index: 8
(University of Tokyo),
Yasunori Baba10
Estimated H-index: 10
(University of Tokyo),
John Walsii25
Estimated H-index: 25
(National Graduate Institute for Policy Studies)
A university laboratory is a fundamental unit of scientific production, but optimizing its organizational design is a formidable task for lab heads, who play potentially conflicting roles of manager, educator, and researcher. Drawing on cross-sectional data from a questionnaire survey and bibliometric data on Japanese biology professors, this study investigates task allocation inside laboratories. Results show a general pattern that lab heads play managerial roles and members (e.g., students) ar...
15 Citations Source Cite
12345678910