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Gilles E. Gignac
University of Western Australia
89Publications
26H-index
2,481Citations
Publications 92
Newest
#1Michael C. W. English (UWA: University of Western Australia)H-Index: 3
#2Michael C. W. English (UWA: University of Western Australia)
Last.Murray T. Maybery (UWA: University of Western Australia)H-Index: 41
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#1Gilles E. Gignac (UWA: University of Western Australia)H-Index: 26
#2Matthew R. Reynolds (KU: University of Kansas)H-Index: 62
Last.Kristof Kovacs (ELTE: Eötvös Loránd University)H-Index: 3
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The Digit Span subscale (Digit Span Forward, Backward, and Sequencing combined composite) internal inconsistency reliability has been reported at .93, based on a coefficient known as stratified coefficient alpha. With accessible examples, we demonstrate that stratified coefficient alpha can deviate substantially from a model-based internal consistency reliability that represents an underlying dimension, that is, omega hierarchical. Next, we simulated item-level Digit Span subscale data to corres...
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#1Ross C. Hollett (ECU: Edith Cowan University)H-Index: 1
#2Helen Morgan (ECU: Edith Cowan University)
Last.Gilles E. Gignac (UWA: University of Western Australia)H-Index: 26
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Two decades of research have shown that women are portrayed sexually in certain types of visual media, including video games, so that women are at greater risk than men of being sexually objectified. We aimed to determine whether greater sexually objectifying gaze occurs during exposure to female characters from games rated for adults only, in comparison to all-ages games and male characters. We also aimed to determine whether men, compared to women, show a greater sexually objectifying gaze whe...
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#2Michael Weinborn (ECU: Edith Cowan University)H-Index: 17
Last.Belinda M. BrownH-Index: 16
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Objectives: To examine the associations between physical activity duration and intensity, cardiorespiratory fitness, and executive function in older adults. Methods: Data from 99 cognitively normal...
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#1Gilles E. GignacH-Index: 26
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#1Gilles E. GignacH-Index: 26
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#1Stephan Lewandowsky (UoB: University of Bristol)H-Index: 51
#2John Cook (GMU: George Mason University)H-Index: 15
Last.Gilles E. Gignac (UWA: University of Western Australia)H-Index: 26
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#1Natalie Frost (UWA: University of Western Australia)
#2Michael Weinborn (ECU: Edith Cowan University)H-Index: 17
Last.Belinda M. Brown (Murdoch University)H-Index: 16
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#1Gilles E. Gignac (UWA: University of Western Australia)H-Index: 26
#2Asher Bartulovich (UWA: University of Western Australia)
Last.Emilee Salleo (UWA: University of Western Australia)
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Abstract Intelligence tests are assumed to require maximal effort on the part of the examinee. However, the degree to which undergraduate first-year psychology volunteers, a commonly used source of participants in low-stakes research, may be motivated to complete a battery of intelligence tests has not yet been tested. Furthermore, the assumption implies that the association between test-taking motivation and intelligence test performance is linear – an assumption untested, to date. Consequently...
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