Match!
Michael A. Arbib
University of Southern California
Machine learningPsychologyMathematicsComputer scienceArtificial neural network
485Publications
69H-index
22.8kCitations
What is this?
Publications 465
Newest
#1Michael A. Arbib (UCSD: University of California, San Diego)H-Index: 69
This hybrid of review and personal essay argues that models of visual construction are essential to extend spatial navigation models to models that link episodic memory and imagination. The starting point is the TAM-WG model, combining the Taxon Affordance Model and the World Graph model of spatial navigation. The key here is to reject approaches in which memory is restricted to unanalyzed views from familiar places, and their later recall. Instead, we will seek mechanisms for imagining truly no...
Source
#1Daniele Caligiore (National Research Council)H-Index: 14
#2Michael A. Arbib (UCSD: University of California, San Diego)H-Index: 69
Last. Gianluca Baldassarre (National Research Council)H-Index: 28
view all 4 authors...
Abstract Despite wide evidence suggesting anatomical and functional interactions between cortex, cerebellum and basal ganglia, the learning processes operating within them --often viewed as respectively unsupervised, supervised and reinforcement learning-- are studied in isolation, neglecting their strong interdependence. We discuss how those brain areas form a highly integrated system combining different learning mechanisms into an effective super-learning process supporting the acquisition of ...
1 CitationsSource
#1Brad Gasser (SC: University of Southern California)H-Index: 4
#2Michael A. Arbib (SC: University of Southern California)H-Index: 69
It has been argued that variation in gesture usage among apes is influenced either by differential sampling of an innate ‘gesture space’ (Hobaiter and Byrne in Anim Cogn 14:745–767, 2011) or through the ‘mutual shaping of behavior’ (Halina et al. in Anim Cogn 16(4):653–666, 2013) referred to as ontogenetic ritualization. In either case, learning must play some role in how individuals come to use particular gestures—either through reinforcement within the set of innately specified gestures, or th...
4 CitationsSource
#1Michael A. Arbib (UCSD: University of California, San Diego)H-Index: 69
#2Francisco Aboitiz (UC: Pontifical Catholic University of Chile)H-Index: 22
Last. Benjamin P. Wilson (Newcastle University)H-Index: 14
view all 20 authors...
We present a new road map for research on “How the Brain Got Language” that adopts an EvoDevoSocio perspective and highlights comparative neuroprimatology – the comparative study of brain, behavior and communication in extant monkeys and great apes – as providing a key grounding for hypotheses on the last common ancestor of humans and monkeys (LCA-m) and chimpanzees (LCA-c) and the processes which guided the evolution LCA-m → LCA-c → protohumans → H. sapiens. Such research constrains and is cons...
3 CitationsSource
Abstract The paper introduces a Special Issue of Interaction Studies which includes 21 papers based on presentations and discussion at a workshop entitled “How the Brain Got Language: Towards a New Road Map.” Unifying themes include the comparative study of brain, behavior and communication in monkeys, apes and humans, and an EvoDevoSocio framework for approaching biological and cultural evolution within a shared perspective. The final article of the special issue builds on the previous papers t...
Source
#1Michael A. Arbib (UCSD: University of California, San Diego)H-Index: 69
Abstract A theory of evolving the language-ready brain requires a theory of what it is that evolved. We offer the TCG (Template Construction Grammar) model of comprehension and production of utterances to exhibit hypotheses on how utterances may link to “what language is about.” A key subsystem of TCG is the SemRep system for semantic representation of a visual scene. We offer an account of how it may have evolved as an expansion of the ventral pathway supporting the planning of manual actions, ...
3 CitationsSource
#1Michael A. Arbib (UCSD: University of California, San Diego)H-Index: 69
2 CitationsSource
#1Michael A. Arbib (UCSD: University of California, San Diego)H-Index: 69
Source
#1Michael A. Arbib (SC: University of Southern California)H-Index: 69
Abstract While structured as an autobiography, this memoir exemplifies ways in which classic contributions to cybernetics (e.g., by Wiener, McCulloch & Pitts, and von Neumann) have fed into a diversity of current research areas, including the mathematical theory of systems and computation, artificial intelligence and robotics, computational neuroscience, linguistics, and cognitive science. The challenges of brain theory receive special emphasis. Action-oriented perception and schema theory compl...
1 CitationsSource
#1Michael A. Arbib (UCSD: University of California, San Diego)H-Index: 69
2 CitationsSource
12345678910