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Mark J.M. Sullman
University of Nicosia
Mobile phonePhoneConfirmatory factor analysisNormativeApplied psychology
5Publications
1H-index
4Citations
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Publications 5
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#1Mark J.M. Sullman (University of Nicosia)H-Index: 1
#1Mark J.M. Sullman (University of Nicosia)H-Index: 22
Last. Joanne E. Taylor (Massey University)H-Index: 17
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Abstract The Driver Behaviour Questionnaire (DBQ) is the most commonly used framework for investigating the relationship between self-reported driving behaviour and crash involvement. However, in spite of the fact that the scale is almost 30 years old, the factor structure of the scale and relationship to crashes in New Zealand remains under-researched. The present study set out to establish the factor structure of the DBQ in a sample of New Zealand private vehicle drivers and to examine the ade...
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#1Mark J.M. Sullman (University of Nicosia)H-Index: 22
#2Amanda N. Stephens (Monash University, Clayton campus)H-Index: 17
Last. Joanne E. Taylor (Massey University)H-Index: 17
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Abstract It is well established that angry and, subsequently, aggressive drivers pose a problem for road safety. Over recent years, there has been an increase in the number of published studies examining driver anger, particularly using the Driving Anger Scale (DAS). The DAS measures six broad types of situations likely to provoke anger while driving (i.e., police presence, illegal driving, discourtesy, traffic obstructions, slower drivers, and hostile gestures). The majority of the recent studi...
1 CitationsSource
#1Aneta Przepiorka (KUL: John Paul II Catholic University of Lublin)H-Index: 14
#2Agata Błachnio (KUL: John Paul II Catholic University of Lublin)H-Index: 13
Last. Mark J.M. Sullman (University of Nicosia)H-Index: 22
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Aim Although it is currently legal in Poland to use a hands-free mobile phone while driving, research suggests that it is not significantly safer than using a hand-held mobile phone. The present study used the theory of planned behaviour (TPB) to examine the relationships that three types of beliefs (behavioural, normative and control beliefs) have with the frequency of drivers’ hands-free and hand-held mobile phone use.
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#1Tetiana Hill (University of Bedfordshire)H-Index: 2
#2Mark J.M. Sullman (University of Nicosia)H-Index: 22
Last. Amanda N. Stephens (Monash University, Clayton campus)H-Index: 17
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Abstract There is extensive evidence that using a mobile phone whilst driving is one of the biggest contributors to driver distraction, which in turn increases the risk of motor vehicle collisions. Whilst most of the developed countries have been trying to deter this behaviour through legislation, enforcement and educational campaigns, in Ukraine, where the road fatality rate is the highest in Europe, this issue has only recently become publicised. The present study examined psychological factor...
1 CitationsSource
#1Hossein Jabbari (Tabriz University of Medical Sciences)H-Index: 3
#2Saber Azami-Aghdash (Tabriz University of Medical Sciences)H-Index: 11
Last. Saeid Safiri (Tehran University of Medical Sciences)H-Index: 27
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