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Neil D. Tsutsui
University of California, Berkeley
68Publications
31H-index
6,624Citations
Publications 68
Newest
Published on Dec 1, 2018in Journal of Chemical Ecology 2.45
Jan Buellesbach1
Estimated H-index: 1
(University of California, Berkeley),
Brian A. Whyte (University of California, Berkeley)+ 4 AuthorsNeil D. Tsutsui31
Estimated H-index: 31
(University of California, Berkeley)
Cuticular hydrocarbons (CHCs), the dominant fraction of the insects’ epicuticle and the primary barrier to desiccation, form the basis for a wide range of chemical signaling systems. In eusocial insects, CHCs are key mediators of nestmate recognition, and colony identity appears to be maintained through a uniform CHC profile. In the unicolonial Argentine ant Linepithema humile, an unparalleled invasive expansion has led to vast supercolonies whose nestmates can still recognize each other across ...
Published on Dec 1, 2018in Ecology and Evolution 2.42
Candice W. Torres4
Estimated H-index: 4
(University of California, Berkeley),
Maria A. Tonione7
Estimated H-index: 7
(University of California, Berkeley)
+ 2 AuthorsNeil D. Tsutsui31
Estimated H-index: 31
(University of California, Berkeley)
Author(s): Torres, CW; Tonione, MA; Ramirez, SR; Sapp, JR; Tsutsui, ND | Abstract: © 2018 The Authors. Ecology and Evolution published by John Wiley a Sons Ltd. Host–parasite associations facilitate the action of reciprocal selection and can drive rapid evolutionary change. When multiple host species are available to a single parasite, parallel specialization on different hosts may promote the action of diversifying natural selection and divergence via host race formation. Here, we examine a pop...
Published on Nov 1, 2018in Journal of Animal Ecology 4.36
Antoine Felden1
Estimated H-index: 1
(Victoria University of Wellington),
Carolina I. Paris4
Estimated H-index: 4
(UBA: University of Buenos Aires)
+ 5 AuthorsMonica A. M. Gruber8
Estimated H-index: 8
(Victoria University of Wellington)
Published on Mar 1, 2018in BioScience 6.59
Neil D. Tsutsui31
Estimated H-index: 31
(University of California, Berkeley)
Published on Feb 1, 2018in Genome Biology and Evolution 3.73
Julie M. Cridland9
Estimated H-index: 9
(UC Davis: University of California, Davis),
Santiago R. Ramírez14
Estimated H-index: 14
(UC Davis: University of California, Davis)
+ 2 AuthorsNeil D. Tsutsui31
Estimated H-index: 31
(University of California, Berkeley)
Author(s): Cridland, JM; Ramirez, SR; Dean, CA; Sciligo, A; Tsutsui, ND | Abstract: © The Author(s) 2018. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of the Society for Molecular Biology and Evolution. The western honey bee, Apis mellifera, is an enormously influential pollinator in both natural and managed ecosystems. In North America, this species has been introduced numerous times from a variety of different source populations in Europe and Africa. Since then, feral populations have expand...
Published on Jan 1, 2017in Myrmecological News 2.62
Jacobus J. Boomsma62
Estimated H-index: 62
(UCPH: University of Copenhagen),
Seán G. Brady29
Estimated H-index: 29
(Smithsonian Institution)
+ 11 AuthorsTed R. Schultz33
Estimated H-index: 33
(Smithsonian Institution)
Published on Feb 1, 2017in Genome Biology and Evolution 3.73
Julie M. Cridland9
Estimated H-index: 9
(UC Davis: University of California, Davis),
Neil D. Tsutsui31
Estimated H-index: 31
(University of California, Berkeley),
Santiago R. Ramírez14
Estimated H-index: 14
(UC Davis: University of California, Davis)
The western honey bee, Apis mellifera, provides critical pollination services to agricultural crops worldwide. However, despite substantial interest and prior investigation, the early evolution and subsequent diversification of this important pollinator remain uncertain. The primary hypotheses place the origin of A. mellifera in either Asia or Africa, with subsequent radiations proceeding from one of these regions. Here, we use two publicly available whole-genome data sets plus newly sequenced g...
Published on Aug 17, 2016
Kaitlyn A. Mathis4
Estimated H-index: 4
(UC: University of California),
Neil D. Tsutsui31
Estimated H-index: 31
(UC: University of California)
Myrmecophiles (i.e. organisms that associate with ants) use a variety of ecological niches and employ different strategies to survive encounters with ants. Because ants are typically excellent defenders, myrmecophiles may choose moments of weakness to take advantage of their ant associates. This hypothesis was studied in the rove beetle, Myrmedonota xipe , which associates with Azteca sericeasur ants in the presence of parasitoid flies. A combination of laboratory and field experiments show that...
Published on Apr 1, 2016in Journal of Chemical Ecology 2.45
Virginia J. Emery1
Estimated H-index: 1
(UC: University of California),
Neil D. Tsutsui31
Estimated H-index: 31
(UC: University of California)
Chemical recognition systems are crucial for maintaining the unity of social insect colonies. It has been proposed that colonies form a common chemical signature, called the gestalt odor, which is used to distinguish colony members and non-members. This chemical integration is achieved actively through social interactions such as trophallaxis and allogrooming, or passively such as through exposure to common nest material. When colonies are infiltrated by social parasites, the intruders often use...
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