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Neil D. Tsutsui
University of California, Berkeley
70Publications
31H-index
6,969Citations
Publications 71
Newest
#1Ida Naughton (UCSD: University of California, San Diego)H-Index: 3
#2Christina L. Boser (TNC: The Nature Conservancy)H-Index: 7
Last.David A. Holway (UCSD: University of California, San Diego)H-Index: 37
view all 4 authors...
Ecological impacts associated with ant introductions have received considerable attention, but most studies that report on these impacts contrast species assemblages between invaded and uninvaded sites. Given the low inferential power of this type of space-for-time comparison, alternative approaches are needed to evaluate claims that ant invasions drive native species loss. Here, we use long-term data sets from two different Argentine ant eradication programs on the California Channel Islands to...
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#1Antoine FeldenH-Index: 4
#2Carolina I. ParisH-Index: 4
Last.Monica A. M. GruberH-Index: 8
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1 CitationsSource
#1Jan Buellesbach (University of California, Berkeley)H-Index: 2
#2Brian A. Whyte (University of California, Berkeley)H-Index: 1
Last.Neil D. Tsutsui (University of California, Berkeley)H-Index: 31
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Cuticular hydrocarbons (CHCs), the dominant fraction of the insects’ epicuticle and the primary barrier to desiccation, form the basis for a wide range of chemical signaling systems. In eusocial insects, CHCs are key mediators of nestmate recognition, and colony identity appears to be maintained through a uniform CHC profile. In the unicolonial Argentine ant Linepithema humile, an unparalleled invasive expansion has led to vast supercolonies whose nestmates can still recognize each other across ...
2 CitationsSource
#1Candice W. Torres (University of California, Berkeley)H-Index: 4
#2Maria A. Tonione (University of California, Berkeley)H-Index: 8
Last.Neil D. Tsutsui (University of California, Berkeley)H-Index: 31
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Author(s): Torres, CW; Tonione, MA; Ramirez, SR; Sapp, JR; Tsutsui, ND | Abstract: © 2018 The Authors. Ecology and Evolution published by John Wiley a Sons Ltd. Host–parasite associations facilitate the action of reciprocal selection and can drive rapid evolutionary change. When multiple host species are available to a single parasite, parallel specialization on different hosts may promote the action of diversifying natural selection and divergence via host race formation. Here, we examine a pop...
1 CitationsSource
#1Antoine Felden (Victoria University of Wellington)H-Index: 4
#2Carolina I. Paris (UBA: University of Buenos Aires)H-Index: 4
Last.Monica A. M. Gruber (Victoria University of Wellington)H-Index: 8
view all 8 authors...
4 CitationsSource
#1Neil D. Tsutsui (University of California, Berkeley)H-Index: 31
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#1Julie M. Cridland (UC Davis: University of California, Davis)H-Index: 10
#2Santiago R. Ramírez (UC Davis: University of California, Davis)H-Index: 14
Last.Neil D. Tsutsui (University of California, Berkeley)H-Index: 31
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Author(s): Cridland, JM; Ramirez, SR; Dean, CA; Sciligo, A; Tsutsui, ND | Abstract: © The Author(s) 2018. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of the Society for Molecular Biology and Evolution. The western honey bee, Apis mellifera, is an enormously influential pollinator in both natural and managed ecosystems. In North America, this species has been introduced numerous times from a variety of different source populations in Europe and Africa. Since then, feral populations have expand...
8 CitationsSource
#1Jacobus J. Boomsma (UCPH: University of Copenhagen)H-Index: 63
#2Seán G. Brady (Smithsonian Institution)H-Index: 30
Last.Sze Huei Yek (UNIL: University of Lausanne)H-Index: 8
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8 Citations
#1Julie M. Cridland (UC Davis: University of California, Davis)H-Index: 10
#2Neil D. Tsutsui (University of California, Berkeley)H-Index: 31
Last.Santiago R. Ramírez (UC Davis: University of California, Davis)H-Index: 14
view all 3 authors...
The western honey bee, Apis mellifera, provides critical pollination services to agricultural crops worldwide. However, despite substantial interest and prior investigation, the early evolution and subsequent diversification of this important pollinator remain uncertain. The primary hypotheses place the origin of A. mellifera in either Asia or Africa, with subsequent radiations proceeding from one of these regions. Here, we use two publicly available whole-genome data sets plus newly sequenced g...
10 CitationsSource
#1Kaitlyn A. Mathis (UC: University of California)H-Index: 5
#2Neil D. Tsutsui (UC: University of California)H-Index: 31
Myrmecophiles (i.e. organisms that associate with ants) use a variety of ecological niches and employ different strategies to survive encounters with ants. Because ants are typically excellent defe...
4 CitationsSource
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