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Ahmed Ahmed
The Ohio State University Wexner Medical Center
Hyperthermic intraperitoneal chemotherapyPerioperativeConventional PCIColorectal cancerMedicine
2Publications
1H-index
1Citations
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Publications 4
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#1Eliza W. Beal (The Ohio State University Wexner Medical Center)H-Index: 10
#2Ahmed Ahmed (The Ohio State University Wexner Medical Center)H-Index: 1
Last. Jordan M. Cloyd (The Ohio State University Wexner Medical Center)H-Index: 9
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Abstract Background Cytoreductive surgery (CRS) with hyperthermic intraperitoneal chemotherapy (HIPEC) is an increasingly utilized strategy for patients with peritoneal surface malignancies (PSM). Methods The US HIPEC Collaborative was retrospectively reviewed to compare the indications and perioperative outcomes of patients who underwent CRS ± HIPEC between 2000 and 2012 (P1) versus 2013–2017 (P2). Results Among 2,364 patients, 39% were from P1 and 61% from P2. The most common primary site was ...
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#1Adriana C. Gamboa (Emory University)H-Index: 1
#2Rachel M. Lee (Emory University)H-Index: 1
Last. Harveshp Mogal (MCW: Medical College of Wisconsin)H-Index: 12
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40Background: Postoperative complications (POCs) are associated with worse oncologic outcomes in various cancer histologies. The impact of POCs on the survival of patients with appendiceal or color...
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#1Adriana C. Gamboa (Emory University)H-Index: 1
#2Mohammad Y. Zaidi (Emory University)H-Index: 4
Last. Shishir K. Maithel (Emory University)H-Index: 38
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Background No guidelines exist for surveillance following cytoreductive surgery with hyperthermic intraperitoneal chemotherapy (CRS/HIPEC) for appendiceal and colorectal cancer. The primary objective was to define the optimal surveillance frequency after CRS/HIPEC.
1 CitationsSource
#2Sindhu Janarthanam Malapati (John H. Stroger, Jr. Hospital of Cook County)
Last. Shweta Gupta (John H. Stroger, Jr. Hospital of Cook County)H-Index: 4
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722Background: Regorafenib (REG) is an oral multikinase inhibitor used for treatment of metastatic colon cancer after progression on fluorouracil, oxaliplatin and irinotecan therapy. The FDA approval was based on CORRECT trial showing improvements in progression-free survival (PFS) and overall survival (OS). Another trial (CONCUR) showed similar results. However, these trials included predominantly Whites and Asians. Our study aimed to evaluate treatment outcomes in the underserved, mainly Afric...
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