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Chulan Kwon
University of California, San Francisco
13Publications
5H-index
834Citations
Publications 22
Newest
#1Katherin M Fomchenko (Johns Hopkins University)
#2Rohan X. Verma (Johns Hopkins University)
Last.Chulan Kwon (Johns Hopkins University)H-Index: 5
view all 13 authors...
Skeletal muscle myocytes have evolved into slow and fast-twitch types. These types are functionally distinct as a result of differential gene and protein expression. However, an understanding of the complexity of gene and protein variation between myofibers is unknown. We performed deep, whole cell, single cell RNA-seq on intact and fragments of skeletal myocytes from the mouse flexor digitorum brevis muscle. We compared the genomic expression data of 171 of these cells with two human proteomic ...
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#1Suraj Kannan (JHUSOM: Johns Hopkins University School of Medicine)H-Index: 2
#2Matthew Miyamoto (JHUSOM: Johns Hopkins University School of Medicine)H-Index: 1
Last.Chulan Kwon (JHUSOM: Johns Hopkins University School of Medicine)H-Index: 5
view all 8 authors...
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#1Emmanouil Tampakakis (Johns Hopkins University)H-Index: 12
#2Matthew Miyamoto (Johns Hopkins University)H-Index: 1
Last.Chulan Kwon (Johns Hopkins University)H-Index: 5
view all 3 authors...
Pluripotent stem cells offer great potential for understanding heart development and disease and for regenerative medicine. While recent advances in developmental cardiology have led to generating cardiac cells from pluripotent stem cells, it is unclear if the two cardiac fields - the first and second heart fields (FHF and SHF) — are induced in pluripotent stem cells systems. To address this, we generated a protocol for in vitro specification and isolation of heart field-specific cardiac progeni...
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#2Amir SaberiH-Index: 6
Last.Chulan KwonH-Index: 5
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Introduction: Sympathetic neurons (SNs) regulate heart rate, conduction velocity, contractility and relaxation of the myocardium. Disruption of SNs in adult cardiac disease, leads to arrhythmias, myocardial dysfunction and sudden cardiac death. However, the role of SNs during cardiac development and
Over the past few decades, major advances have been made in identifying the origins of cardiac cells from developing embryos. In particular, the discovery of the first heart field (FHF) and the sec...
#1Gun Sik ChoH-Index: 4
Last.Chulan KwonH-Index: 5
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This protocol describes how to generate mature adult-like cardiomyocytes by culturing mouse or human PSCs in vitro initially and then transferring to neonatal rats for further cell maturation.
4 CitationsSource
#1Emmanouil Tampakakis (Johns Hopkins University)H-Index: 12
#2Peter Andersen (Johns Hopkins University)H-Index: 5
Last.Chulan Kwon (Johns Hopkins University)H-Index: 5
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Introduction: Congenital heart disease is the most common birth defect (1% of live born infants) and most children, who survive to adulthood, will develop severe heart failure. At present, heart transplantation is the only definite treatment for advanced heart failure patients. Heart development involves an early assignment of two distinct cellular populations, called cardiac progenitor cells (CPCs), which generate the first and the second heart field and subsequently the left and right ventricu...
#1Yohan Oh (JHUSOM: Johns Hopkins University School of Medicine)H-Index: 3
#2Gun Sik Cho (JHUSOM: Johns Hopkins University School of Medicine)
Last.Gabsang LeeH-Index: 29
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Summary Neurons derived from human pluripotent stem cells (hPSCs) are powerful tools for studying human neural development and diseases. Robust functional coupling of hPSC-derived neurons with target tissues in vitro is essential for modeling intercellular physiology in a dish and to further translational studies, but it has proven difficult to achieve. Here, we derive sympathetic neurons from hPSCs and show that they can form physical and functional connections with cardiac muscle cells. Using ...
29 CitationsSource
#1Hideki Uosaki (Johns Hopkins University)H-Index: 14
#2Patrick Cahan (Harvard University)H-Index: 24
Last.Chulan Kwon (Johns Hopkins University)H-Index: 5
view all 8 authors...
Summary Decades of progress in developmental cardiology has advanced our understanding of the early aspects of heart development, including cardiomyocyte (CM) differentiation. However, control of the CM maturation that is subsequently required to generate adult myocytes remains elusive. Here, we analyzed over 200 microarray datasets from early embryonic to adult hearts and identified a large number of genes whose expression shifts gradually and continuously during maturation. We generated an atl...
37 CitationsSource
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