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T. Jonathan Davies
McGill University
60Publications
32H-index
4,961Citations
Publications 60
Newest
#1Nicholas M. Fountain-Jones (UMN: University of Minnesota)H-Index: 6
#2William D. Pearse (USU: Utah State University)H-Index: 12
Last.Katherine Worsley-Tonks (UMN: University of Minnesota)H-Index: 1
view all 11 authors...
Identifying patterns and drivers of infectious disease dynamics across multiple scales is a fundamental challenge for modern science. There is growing awareness that it is necessary to incorporate multi-host and/or multi-parasite interactions to understand and predict current and future disease threats better, and new tools are needed to help address this task. Eco-phylogenetics (phylogenetic community ecology) provides one avenue for exploring multi-host multi-parasite systems, yet the incorpor...
#1William D. Pearse (McGill University)H-Index: 12
#2Charles C. Davis (Harvard University)H-Index: 40
Last.T. Jonathan Davies (McGill University)H-Index: 9
view all 5 authors...
Climate change affects not just where species are found, but also when species’ key life-history events occur—their phenology. Measuring such changes in timing is often hampered by a reliance on biased survey data: surveys identify that an event has taken place (for example, the flower is in bloom), but not when that event happened (for example, the flower bloomed yesterday). Here, we show that this problem can be circumvented using statistical estimators, which can provide accurate and unbiased...
#2Maxwell J. FarrellH-Index: 5
Last.T. Jonathan Davies (UJ: University of Johannesburg)H-Index: 9
view all 3 authors...
Languages are being lost at rates exceeding the global loss of biodiversity. With the extinction of a language we lose irreplaceable dimensions of culture and the insight it provides on human history and the evolution of linguistic diversity. When setting conservation goals, biologists give higher priority to species likely to go extinct. Recent methods now integrate information on species evolutionary relationships to prioritize the conservation of those with a few close relatives. Advances in ...
#1Marc W. Cadotte (SYSU: Sun Yat-sen University)H-Index: 41
#2T. Jonathan Davies (McGill University)H-Index: 9
Last.Pedro R. Peres-Neto (Concordia University)H-Index: 18
view all 3 authors...
The merger of phylogenies with ecology has given rise to the field of “community phylogenetics” predicated on the assumption that ecological differences among species can be estimated from phylogenetic relationships (the phylogenetic distance/ecological difference, PDED, hypothesis). A number of studies have failed to find strong support for this assumption, thus challenging the utility of phylogenetic approaches. This gap might highlight the fact that the PDED relationship is not useful for com...
#1Barnabas H. Daru (University of Pretoria)H-Index: 13
#2Tammy L. Elliott (UdeM: Université de Montréal)H-Index: 1
Last.T. Jonathan Davies (McGill University)H-Index: 9
view all 4 authors...
A key step in understanding the distribution of biodiversity is the grouping of regions based on their shared elements. Historically, regionalization schemes have been largely species centric. Recently, there has been interest in incorporating phylogenetic information into regionalization schemes. Phylogenetic regionalization can provide novel insights into the mechanisms that generate, distribute, and maintain biodiversity. We argue that four processes (dispersal limitation, extinction, speciat...
#1Barnabas H. Daru (University of Pretoria)H-Index: 13
#2Ben G. Holt (Imperial College London)H-Index: 10
Last.T. Jonathan Davies (McGill University)H-Index: 9
view all 5 authors...
Abstract While our knowledge of species distributions and diversity in the terrestrial biosphere has increased sharply over the last decades, we lack equivalent knowledge of the marine world. Here, we use the phylogenetic tree of seagrasses along with their global distributions and a metric of phylogenetic beta diversity to generate a phylogenetically-based delimitation of marine phytoregions (phyloregions). We then evaluate their evolutionary affinities and explore environmental correlates of p...
#1Tammy L. Elliott (UdeM: Université de Montréal)H-Index: 1
#2T. Jonathan Davies (McGill University)H-Index: 9
Competitive exclusion is most likely when there are large differences in competitive ability and the strength of competitive interactions between species is high, but predicting competitive outcomes is not straightforward. Assuming a trade-off between competitive ability and ecological generalism, we would predict larger competitive differences between species with different niche widths. Community phylogenetic theory predicts that competition will be stronger among more closely related species,...
#1Sandrine Pavoine (CNRS: Centre national de la recherche scientifique)H-Index: 10
#2Michael B. Bonsall (University of Oxford)H-Index: 34
Last.Shelly Masi (CNRS: Centre national de la recherche scientifique)H-Index: 7
view all 4 authors...
A sixth great mass extinction is ongoing due to the direct and indirect effects of human pressures. However, not all lineages are impacted equally. As humans, we frequently believe that we hold a unique place on Earth. Here, we show that our current impacts on the natural world risk to heighten that expectation. Evolutionary proximity to Homo sapiens emerges as a powerful predictor of extinction risk among mammals. Our analysis shows that the species most closely related to H. sapiens are expose...
Aim We present a novel quantitative framework that combines information on phylogeny and the spatial distributions of related species to enhance the single-species distributional models commonly used in ecology. Innovation While species distribution models (SDMs) are becoming increasingly sophisticated, they rarely take into consideration the shared evolutionary histories of species. Species are not independent entities, and phylogenies may capture how species have configured their spatial distr...
#1Caroline M. Tucker (CU: University of Colorado Boulder)H-Index: 12
#2Marc W. Cadotte (SYSU: Sun Yat-sen University)H-Index: 41
Last.Arne Ø. Mooers (SFU: Simon Fraser University)H-Index: 39
view all 16 authors...
The use of phylogenies in ecology is increasingly common and has broadened our understanding of biological diversity. Ecological sub-disciplines, particularly conservation, community ecology and macroecology, all recognize the value of evolutionary relationships but the resulting development of phylogenetic approaches has led to a proliferation of phylogenetic diversity metrics. The use of many metrics across the sub-disciplines hampers potential meta-analyses, syntheses, and generalizations of ...
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