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Christopher A. Klausmeier
Michigan State University
Community structureEcologyPhytoplanktonExtinctionBiology
31Publications
27H-index
4,711Citations
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Publications 6
Newest
#1Mathew A. Leibold (UF: University of Florida)H-Index: 36
#2Mark C. Urban (UConn: University of Connecticut)H-Index: 29
Last. Joost Vanoverbeke (Katholieke Universiteit Leuven)H-Index: 22
view all 5 authors...
Biodiversity in natural systems can be maintained either because niche differentiation among competitors facilitates stable coexistence or because equal fitness among neutral species allows for their long-term cooccurrence despite a slow drift toward extinction. Whereas the relative importance of these two ecological mechanisms has been well-studied in the absence of evolution, the role of local adaptive evolution in maintaining biological diversity through these processes is less clear. Here we...
7 CitationsSource
#1Simon Maccracken Stump (Yale University)H-Index: 6
#2Evan Curtis Johnson (UC Davis: University of California, Davis)H-Index: 3
Last. Christopher A. Klausmeier (MSU: Michigan State University)H-Index: 17
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Abstract Cooperative cross-feeding, a resource-exchange mutualism between microbes, is ubiquitous; however, models suggest it should be susceptible to cheating. Recent work suggested two novel mechanisms that could allow cross-feeders to exclude cheaters, even in the absence of tight coupling between cooperative organisms. The first is pattern formation, where cross-feeders form regular patterns so that their resources are separated and cheaters cannot obtain both. The second mechanism is neighb...
2 CitationsSource
#1Simon Maccracken Stump (MSU: Michigan State University)H-Index: 6
#2Evan Curtis Johnson (UC Davis: University of California, Davis)H-Index: 3
Last. Christopher A. Klausmeier (MSU: Michigan State University)H-Index: 17
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Abstract The ubiquity of cooperative cross-feeding (a resource-exchange mutualism) raises two related questions: Why is cross-feeding favored over self-sufficiency, and how are cross-feeders protected from non-producing cheaters? The Black Queen Hypothesis suggests that if leaky resources are costly, then there should be selection for either gene loss or self-sufficiency, but selection against mutualistic inter-dependency. Localized interactions have been shown to protect mutualists against chea...
4 CitationsSource
#1Simon Maccracken Stump (Yale University)H-Index: 6
#2Evan Curtis Johnson (MSU: Michigan State University)H-Index: 3
Last. Christopher A. Klausmeier (MSU: Michigan State University)H-Index: 17
view all 3 authors...
Mutualisms are ubiquitous, but models predict they should be susceptible to cheating. Resolving this paradox has become relevant to synthetic ecology: cooperative cross-feeding, a nutrient-exchange...
8 CitationsSource
#1Matthew M. Osmond (UBC: University of British Columbia)H-Index: 6
#2Christopher A. Klausmeier (MSU: Michigan State University)H-Index: 17
Populations can persist in directionally changing environments by evolving. Quantitative genetic theory aims to predict critical rates of environmental change beyond which populations go extinct. Here, we point out that all current predictions effectively assume the same specific fitness function. This function causes selection on the standing genetic variance of quantitative traits to become increasingly strong as mean trait values depart from their optima. Hence, there is no bound on the rate ...
6 CitationsSource
#1Jonas Wickman (Umeå University)H-Index: 1
#2Sebastian Diehl (Umeå University)H-Index: 38
Last. Åke Brännström (Umeå University)H-Index: 20
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Spatial structure can decisively influence the way evolutionary processes unfold. To date, several methods have been used to study evolution in spatial systems, including population genetics, quant ...
3 CitationsSource
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