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Newell R. Kitchen
United States Department of Agriculture
40Publications
9H-index
294Citations
Publications 40
Newest
#1Matt A. Yost (USU: Utah State University)H-Index: 8
#2Newell R. Kitchen (USDA: United States Department of Agriculture)H-Index: 9
Last.M. R. Volkmann (USDA: United States Department of Agriculture)H-Index: 1
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After two decades of availability of grain yield-mapping technology, long-term trends in field-scale profitability for precision agriculture (PA) systems and conservation practices can now be assessed. Field-scale profitability of a conventional or ‘business-as-usual’ system with an annual corn (Zea mays L.)-soybean (Glycine max [L.]) rotation and annual tillage was assessed for 11 years on a 36 ha field in central Missouri during 1993 to 2003. Following this, a ‘precision agriculture system’ (P...
1 CitationsSource
#1Gregory M. BeanH-Index: 3
#2Newell R. KitchenH-Index: 9
Last.J. S. ShanahanH-Index: 2
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5 CitationsSource
#1Zhisheng Qin (DuPont Pioneer)H-Index: 1
#2D. Brenton Myers (DuPont Pioneer)H-Index: 10
Last.John F. ShanahanH-Index: 20
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3 CitationsSource
#1Kristen S. Veum (USDA: United States Department of Agriculture)H-Index: 10
#2Kenneth A. Sudduth (USDA: United States Department of Agriculture)H-Index: 41
Last.Newell R. Kitchen (USDA: United States Department of Agriculture)H-Index: 9
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Abstract Assessment of soil health involves determining how well a soil is performing its biological, chemical, and physical functions relative to its inherent potential. Due to high cost, labor requirements, and soil disturbance, traditional laboratory analyses cannot provide high resolution soil health data. Therefore, sensor-based approaches are important to facilitate cost-effective, site-specific management for soil health. In the Central Claypan Region of Missouri, USA, visible and near-in...
10 CitationsSource
#1Matt A. Yost (USDA: United States Department of Agriculture)H-Index: 8
#2Bryan K. Randall (Dow AgroSciences)H-Index: 2
Last.Robert L. Myers (MU: University of Missouri)H-Index: 5
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6 CitationsSource
#1Newell R. Kitchen (USDA: United States Department of Agriculture)H-Index: 9
#2John F. ShanahanH-Index: 20
Last.Matt Shafer (Purdue University)H-Index: 1
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10 CitationsSource
11 CitationsSource
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#1Laura Thompson (NU: University of Nebraska–Lincoln)H-Index: 2
#2Richard B. Ferguson (NU: University of Nebraska–Lincoln)H-Index: 26
Last.James S. Schepers (NU: University of Nebraska–Lincoln)H-Index: 41
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26 CitationsSource
#1E. J. Sadler (USDA: United States Department of Agriculture)H-Index: 1
#2Kenneth A. Sudduth (USDA: United States Department of Agriculture)H-Index: 41
Last.Newell R. Kitchen (USDA: United States Department of Agriculture)H-Index: 9
view all 5 authors...
Year-to-year dynamics in weather affect both the timing of application and the potential hydrologic transport of pesticides. Further, the most commonly used pesticides dissipate in the environment during the growing season. Interactions among these factors – hydrology, timing of application and dissipation kinetics – hinder the detection of temporal trends in transport. It is increasingly important to be able to discern such trends, to judge effectiveness of management practices or to determine ...
8 CitationsSource
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