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Kyle H. Elliott
McGill University
31Publications
8H-index
137Citations
Publications 31
Newest
ABSTRACT In birds, many physiological parameters appear to remain constant with increasing age, showing no deterioration until ‘catastrophic’ mortality sets in. Given their high whole-organism metabolic rate and the importance of flight in foraging and predator avoidance, flight muscle deterioration and accumulated oxidative stress and tissue deterioration may be an important contributor to physiological senescence in wild birds. As a by-product of aerobic respiration, reactive oxygen species ar...
#1Mélanie F. Guigueno (McGill University)H-Index: 12
#2Akiko Shoji (University of Tsukuba)H-Index: 9
Last.Stéphane Aris-Brosou (U of O: University of Ottawa)H-Index: 16
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Abstract Flight costs play an important role in determining the behavior, ecology, and physiology of birds and bats. Mechanical flight costs can be estimated from aerodynamics. However, measured metabolic flight costs (oxygen consumption rate) are less accurately predicted by flight theory, either because of (1) variation in flight efficiency across species, (2) variation in how basal costs interact with flight costs or (3) methodological biases. To tease apart these three hypotheses, we conduct...
#1Sydney M. Collins (U of G: University of Guelph)
#2Scott A. HatchH-Index: 29
Last.Shoshanah Jacobs (U of G: University of Guelph)H-Index: 6
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As many long-lived seabirds are biparental and monogamous, individuals need to choose their mates wisely. While assortative mating based on physical traits is widely studied, mate choice in sexually monomorphic species based on behavioural traits remains poorly understood. We propose that personality is a possible factor on which mate choice is based and that certain personality traits within a behavioural syndrome confer a greater fitness. Here we measure boldness, a commonly explored behaviour...
#1Emma Nip (U of G: University of Guelph)
#2Barbara Frei (U of O: University of Ottawa)
Last.Kyle H. Elliott (McGill University)H-Index: 8
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Avian body mass reflects a trade-off between risk of starvation and predation, and may vary with ambient temperature, age, and time of day. Seasonal variability in body mass is a common occurrence in northern temperate regions, including adaptive fattening. Previous evidence suggests that seasonal variability is less pronounced in tree-feeding bird species, as their food sources during winter are less limited and variable compared to ground-foraging species. We determined fat scores of tree-feed...
#1Mark L. Mallory (Acadia University)H-Index: 3
#2Anthony J. Gaston (Carleton University)H-Index: 43
Last.Allison Patterson (McGill University)H-Index: 1
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The Canadian Arctic hosts millions of marine birds annually, many of which aggregate in large numbers at well-defined sites at predictable times of the year. Marine habitats in this region will be ...
#1Émile Brisson-Curadeau (McGill University)H-Index: 2
#2H. Grant Gilchrist (EC: Environment Canada)H-Index: 12
Last.Kyle H. Elliott (McGill University)H-Index: 8
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Analyzing how animals are distributed in space and time is important to understand the behavioural interactions that underlie population dynamics, especially for highly social species. Thick-billed murres (Uria lomvia) breed in some of the largest and densest colonies of any seabird. Although this bird is known to aggregate at sea, little is known about when, where, and why the birds form aggregations. We examined the spatial and temporal patterns of foraging aggregations during the breeding sea...
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