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Ryan C. McKellar
University of Regina
14Publications
5H-index
93Citations
Publications 14
Newest
Published on Jan 1, 2019in Cretaceous Research 1.93
Lida Xing18
Estimated H-index: 18
(China University of Geosciences),
Andrew J. Ross17
Estimated H-index: 17
(National Museum of Scotland)
+ 2 AuthorsRyan C. McKellar5
Estimated H-index: 5
(University of Regina)
Abstract Gastropods are generally rare in amber. In this paper we describe an example of exceptional soft-bodied preservation in a fossil terrestrial mollusk-a snail shell with some tissue, including part of the cephalic region (head) with a tentacle and inferred eye stalk, and potentially part of the foot and operculum. The snail, a probable juvenile, is preserved in Burmese amber (Burmite) from Myanmar, of earliest Cenomanian age. Morphological evidence suggests a cyclophoroidean ancestry and ...
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Published on Dec 1, 2018in Scientific Reports 4.12
Lida Xing18
Estimated H-index: 18
(China University of Geosciences),
Benjamin Sames9
Estimated H-index: 9
(University of Vienna)
+ 3 AuthorsWANXiaoqiao14
Estimated H-index: 14
(China University of Geosciences)
The mid-Cretaceous Burmese amber (~99 Ma, Myanmar), widely known for exquisite preservation of theropods, also yields microfossils, which can provide important contextual information on paleoenvironment and amber formation. We report the first Cretaceous ostracod in amber—the gigantic (12.9 mm) right valve of an exclusively marine group (Myodocopa: Myodocopida) preserved in Burmese amber. Ostracods are usually small (0.5–2 mm), with well-calcified carapaces that provide an excellent fossil recor...
6 Citations Source Cite
Kaarel Mänd2
Estimated H-index: 2
(University of Tartu),
Karlis Muehlenbachs41
Estimated H-index: 41
(University of Alberta)
+ 2 AuthorsKurt O. Konhauser48
Estimated H-index: 48
(University of Alberta)
Abstract Ambers—fossilized plant resins—are a rich and unique source of paleoecological data due to their ability to preserve soft body fossils. However, interpretations concerning their environmental context are often hampered by uncertainties in the relationship between assemblages of inclusions and geological context, particularly in the case of secondarily redeposited ambers such as those from the Paleogene of Central Europe. Here we use stable carbon and hydrogen isotope analyses, as well a...
5 Citations Source Cite
Published on Jul 1, 2018in Science Advances
Lida Xing18
Estimated H-index: 18
(China University of Geosciences),
Michael W. Caldwell32
Estimated H-index: 32
(University of Alberta)
+ 9 AuthorsHongliang Shi1
Estimated H-index: 1
(Beijing Forestry University)
We present the first known fossilized snake embryo/neonate preserved in early Late Cretaceous (Early Cenomanian) amber from Myanmar, which at the time, was an island arc including terranes from Austral Gondwana. This unique and very tiny snake fossil is an articulated postcranial skeleton, which includes posterior precloacal, cloacal, and caudal vertebrae, and details of squamation and body shape; a second specimen preserves a fragment of shed skin interpreted as a snake. Important details of sk...
3 Citations Source Cite
Published on Feb 1, 2018in Comptes Rendus Palevol 1.43
Pierre F.D. Cockx1
Estimated H-index: 1
(University of Rennes),
Ryan C. McKellar5
Estimated H-index: 5
(University of Regina)
Abstract A new genus and species from the subfamily Pemphredoninae (Hymenoptera: Crabronidae) is described from the Upper Cretaceous amber of Myanmar, commonly known as Burmese amber. A complete, illustrated description is provided. Colmepsiterona cumcarena n. gen. et sp. represents the third record of the subfamily in the deposit, as well as the tenth of the family Crabronidae in Mesozoic. This taxon is morphologically close to Cretospilomena familiaris , previously described in the same deposi...
1 Citations Source Cite
Published on Nov 6, 2017in Zootaxa 0.93
Andris Bukejs8
Estimated H-index: 8
(Daugavpils University),
Vitalii I. Alekseev3
Estimated H-index: 3
+ 2 AuthorsRyan C. McKellar5
Estimated H-index: 5
(University of Regina)
Hemicoelus favonii sp. nov. is described and illustrated from Eocene Baltic amber. This new fossil species differs from extant congeners in having 11-segmented antennae; a metathoracic ventrite with large impression in its anterior portion; a pronotum distinctly narrower than the elytral base region; the posterior suture of abdominal ventrite 1 weakly arcuate medially; sharp lateral pronotal margins that are incomplete and distinct in their basal half only; elytral striae that are not grouped in...
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Published on Mar 1, 2017in Current Biology 9.25
Lida Xing18
Estimated H-index: 18
(China University of Geosciences),
Ryan C. McKellar5
Estimated H-index: 5
(University of Regina)
+ 11 AuthorsAlexander P. Wolfe47
Estimated H-index: 47
(University of Alberta)
Summary In his correspondence, Markus Lambertz [1] raises some concerns about the phylogenetic placement and feather development of DIP-V-15103, the amber-entombed tail section that we recently reported [2] as fragmentary remains of a non-pygostylian coelurosaur (likely within the basal part of Coelurosauria). We here would like to respond to these concerns.
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Published on Dec 1, 2016in Cretaceous Research 1.93
Pierre F.D. Cockx1
Estimated H-index: 1
(University of Rennes),
Ryan C. McKellar5
Estimated H-index: 5
(University of Regina)
Abstract Two new genera and species belonging to the family Scolebythidae are described from mid-Cretaceous amber of Myanmar, Cursoribythus silvestris and Siccibythus musculosus . These taxa are introduced into the current phylogenetic tree of the family, in order to analyze their relationships and observe their impacts on our understanding of the family. The implication of the findings (this is the first record of the family in the Cretaceous amber deposits of Myanmar) are discussed.
3 Citations Source Cite
Published on Dec 1, 2016in Current Biology 9.25
Lida Xing18
Estimated H-index: 18
(China University of Geosciences),
Ryan C. McKellar5
Estimated H-index: 5
(University of Regina)
+ 11 AuthorsAlexander P. Wolfe47
Estimated H-index: 47
(University of Alberta)
Summary In the two decades since the discovery of feathered dinosaurs [1–3], the range of plumage known from non-avialan theropods has expanded significantly, confirming several features predicted by developmentally informed models of feather evolution [4–10]. However, three-dimensional feather morphology and evolutionary patterns remain difficult to interpret, due to compression in sedimentary rocks [9, 11]. Recent discoveries in Cretaceous amber from Canada, France, Japan, Lebanon, Myanmar, an...
32 Citations Source Cite
Published on Nov 1, 2016in Nature Communications 12.35
Lida Xing18
Estimated H-index: 18
(China University of Geosciences),
Ryan C. McKellar5
Estimated H-index: 5
(University of Regina)
+ 10 AuthorsMartinGLockley38
Estimated H-index: 38
(University of Colorado Denver)
Our knowledge of Cretaceous plumage is limited by the fossil record itself: compression fossils surrounding skeletons lack the finest morphological details and seldom preserve visible traces of colour, while discoveries in amber have been disassociated from their source animals. Here we report the osteology, plumage and pterylosis of two exceptionally preserved theropod wings from Burmese amber, with vestiges of soft tissues. The extremely small size and osteological development of the wings, co...
23 Citations Source Cite
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