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Marcus J. Hamilton
University of Texas at San Antonio
ArchaeologyGeographyAmazonianPleistoceneIndigenous
13Publications
2H-index
7Citations
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Publications 12
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#1Marcus J. Hamilton (UTSA: University of Texas at San Antonio)H-Index: 2
#2Robert S S Walker (MU: University of Missouri)
Last. Chris Kempes (SFI: Santa Fe Institute)H-Index: 1
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A key feature of the distribution of life on Earth is the positive correlation between environmental productivity and biodiversity. This correlation also characterizes the distribution of human cultural diversity, which is highest near the equator and decreases exponentially toward the poles. Moreover, it is now understood that the tropics house more biodiversity than would be expected from energy availability alone suggesting diversity begets diversity. Here we show the same is also true for hu...
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#1Luís M. A. Bettencourt (U of C: University of Chicago)H-Index: 36
#2Vicky Chuqiao Yang (SFI: Santa Fe Institute)H-Index: 2
Last. Marcus J. HamiltonH-Index: 25
view all 6 authors...
Scaling is a general analytical framework used by many disciplines — from physics to biology and the social sciences — to characterize how population–averaged properties of a collective vary with its size. The observation of scale invariance over some range identifies general system types, be they ideal gases, ecosystems, or cities. The use of scaling in the analysis of cities quantifies many of their arguably fundamental general characteristics, especially their capacity to create interrelated ...
3 CitationsSource
#1José Lobo (ASU: Arizona State University)H-Index: 18
#2Marina Alberti (UW: University of Washington)H-Index: 32
Last. Wei‐Qiang Chen (Yale University)H-Index: 1
view all 35 authors...
Urban science seeks to understand the fundamental processes that drive, shape and sustain cities and urbanization. It is a multi/transdisciplinary approach involving concepts, methods and research from the social, natural, engineering and computational sciences, along with the humanities. This report is intended to convey the current “state of the art” in urban science while also clearly indicating how urban science builds upon and complements (but does not replace) prior work on cities and urba...
2 CitationsSource
#1Marcus J. Hamilton (UTSA: University of Texas at San Antonio)H-Index: 2
#2Robert S. Walker (MU: University of Missouri)H-Index: 23
Group living is common in mammals, particularly in primates and humans. Across species, groups are social networks where co-residing members exchange information and balance trade-offs between competition and cooperation for space, resources, and reproductive opportunities. From a macroecological perspective, species-specific group sizes are ultimately constrained by body size, population density, and the environmental supply rate of home ranges. Here, we derive an allometric null model for grou...
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#1Marcus J. Hamilton (UTSA: University of Texas at San Antonio)H-Index: 25
#1Marcus J. Hamilton (UTSA: University of Texas at San Antonio)H-Index: 2
Last. Robert S. Walker (MU: University of Missouri)H-Index: 23
view all 2 authors...
The expansion of the human species out of Africa in the Pleistocene, and the subsequent development of agriculture in the Holocene resulted in waves of linguistic diversification and replacement across the planet. Analogous to the growth of populations or the speciation of biological organisms, languages diversify over time to form phylogenies of language families. However, the dynamics of this diversification process are unclear. Bayesian methods applied to lexical and phonetic data have create...
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#1Marcus J. Hamilton (UTSA: University of Texas at San Antonio)H-Index: 2
#2Briggs Buchanan (TU: University of Tulsa)H-Index: 24
Last. Robert S. Walker (MU: University of Missouri)H-Index: 23
view all 3 authors...
Abstract North America was initially colonized by humans during the late Pleistocene, and over the course of the Holocene material culture diversified as local populations adapted to regional environments. However, to date, while anthropologists and archaeologists have long been interested in diversity, little is known of the process of diversification over space and time. Here, we focus on the diversification of the archaeological record of western North America over 13,000 years. By compiling ...
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#1Briggs Buchanan (TU: University of Tulsa)H-Index: 24
#2Marcus J. Hamilton (UTSA: University of Texas at San Antonio)H-Index: 2
Last. J. David Kilby (Texas State University)H-Index: 5
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North America was first settled in the late Pleistocene by Paleoindian peoples, Clovis is the best documented archeological complex associated with this settlement. Undoubtedly, Clovis groups faced adaptive challenges in the novel environments of a sparsely populated New World. In this paper, we ask whether Clovis had small-world networks to help them create and maintain connections across the vast landscape of western North America. Small worlds are properties of many real networks and are char...
Source
#1Robert S. Walker (MU: University of Missouri)H-Index: 23
#2Marcus J. Hamilton (UTSA: University of Texas at San Antonio)H-Index: 2
1 CitationsSource
#1Marcus J. HamiltonH-Index: 2
#2Robert S. WalkerH-Index: 23
#1Marcus J. HamiltonH-Index: 2
#2Briggs BuchananH-Index: 24
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