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Jennifer F. Provencher
Acadia University
28Publications
5H-index
98Citations
Publications 28
Newest
#1Dominique G. Roche (Carleton University)H-Index: 1
#2Joseph R. Bennett (Carleton University)H-Index: 15
Last.Steven J. Cooke (Carleton University)H-Index: 65
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Abstract Discussions around the “slow science movement” abound in environmental sciences, yet they are generally counterproductive. Researchers must focus on producing robust and transparent knowledge, regardless of speed. Slow versus fast science is irrelevant - what we need is reproducible research to support evidence-based decision making and tackle urgent and costly environmental problems.
#1Steven M. Alexander (UW: University of Waterloo)H-Index: 6
#2Jennifer F. Provencher (CWS: Canadian Wildlife Service)H-Index: 5
Last.Steven J. Cooke (Carleton University)H-Index: 65
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Background The incorporation of multiple types of knowledge (e.g., science, Indigenous knowledge, traditional ecological knowledge) is an important undertaking, which can strengthen the evidence-base for policy advice, decision making, and environmental management. While the benefits of incorporating multiple types of knowledge in environmental research and management are many, successfully doing so has remained a challenge. In response there has been a number of recent reviews that have sought ...
#1Mark L. Mallory (Acadia University)H-Index: 18
#2Christine M. Anderson (Acadia University)H-Index: 1
Last.Jennifer F. Provencher (CWS: Canadian Wildlife Service)H-Index: 5
view all 5 authors...
Abstract Contamination of Arctic marine environments continues to be a concern for wildlife managers. Because the Arctic is a sink for the long-range transport of persistent organic pollutants (POPs), many studies have detected high concentrations of POPs in various Arctic birds. In this study from high Arctic Canada, we show that male Arctic terns ( Sterna paradisaea ), which migrate from the Antarctic to the Arctic annually to breed, decline in concentrations of many hepatic POPs through the b...
#2Tony R. WalkerH-Index: 10
Last.Jennifer F. Provencher (CWS: Canadian Wildlife Service)H-Index: 5
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This rejoinder challenges the assertions made by Stafford and Jones in the Marine Policy article: “Viewpoint – Ocean plastic pollution: A convenient but distracting truth?”. That article - and its title - are counter-productive to a shared goal of conserving the environment for current, and future generations. While it is important to keep global threats in perspective, we simply do not have the luxury of tackling environmental issues one at a time. The authors provide no evidence to support the...
#1Zhe Lu (Université du Québec à Rimouski)H-Index: 1
#2Amila O. De SilvaH-Index: 19
Last.Stephanie Avery-Gomm (Carleton University)
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Substituted diphenylamine antioxidants (SDPAs) and benzotriazole UV stabilizers (BZT-UVs) are contaminants of emerging environmental concern. However, little is known about the occurrence of these contaminants in the Arctic. In this study, we investigated the levels of 11 SDPAs and 6 BZT-UVs in livers and eggs of two seabird species, the black-legged kittiwake (Rissa tridactyla) and northern fulmar (Fulmarus glacialis), as well as the liver of ringed seals (Pusa hispida) from Canadian high- and ...
Last.Karen D. McCoyH-Index: 1
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Parasites are ubiquitous in the environment, and can cause negative effects in their host species. Importantly, seabirds can be long-lived and cross multiple continents within a single annual cycle, thus their exposure to parasites may be greater than other taxa. With changing climatic conditions expected to influence parasite distribution and abundance, understanding current level of infection, transmission pathways and population-level impacts are integral aspects for predicting ecosystem chan...
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