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Veena Sriram
University of Chicago
NursingSpecialtyHealth services researchHealth policyMedicine
5Publications
1H-index
12Citations
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Publications 9
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#1Veena Sriram (U of C: University of Chicago)H-Index: 1
#2Rama V. Baru (JNU: Jawaharlal Nehru University)H-Index: 5
Last. Sara C Bennett (Johns Hopkins University)H-Index: 32
view all 4 authors...
Abstract In many countries, professional councils are mandated to oversee the training and conduct of health professionals, including doctors, nurses, pharmacists and allied health workers. The proper functioning of these councils is critical to overall health system performance. Yet, professional councils are routinely criticized, particularly in the context of low- and middle-income countries, for their misuse of power and overtly bureaucratic nature. The objective of this paper is to understa...
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#1Kabir Sheikh (WHO: World Health Organization)H-Index: 1
#2Veena Sriram (U of C: University of Chicago)H-Index: 1
Last. Maryam BigdeliH-Index: 14
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The lack of capacity for governance of Ministries of Health (MoHs) is frequently advanced as an explanation for health systems failures in low- and middle-income countries (LMICs). But do we understand what governance capacities MoHs should have? Existing frameworks have not fully captured the dynamic and contextually determined role of MoHs, and there are few frameworks that specifically define capacities for governance. We propose a multidimensional framework of capacities for governance by Mo...
#1Veena Sriram (U of C: University of Chicago)H-Index: 1
#2Sara C Bennett (Johns Hopkins University)H-Index: 32
The availability of medical specialists has accelerated in low-income and middle-income countries (LMICs), driven by factors including epidemiological and demographic shifts, doctors’ preferences for postgraduate training, income growth and medical tourism. Yet, despite some policy efforts to increase access to specialists in rural health facilities and improve referral systems, many policy questions are still underaddressed or unaddressed in LMIC health sectors, including in the context of univ...
1 CitationsSource
#1Kavi S. Bhalla (U of C: University of Chicago)H-Index: 25
#2Veena Sriram (U of C: University of Chicago)H-Index: 1
Last. Dinesh Mohan (IITD: Indian Institute of Technology Delhi)H-Index: 64
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Introduction Ambulance-based emergency medical systems (EMS) are expensive and remain rare in low- and middle-income countries, where trauma victims are usually transported to hospital by passing vehicles. Recent developments in transportation network technologies could potentially disrupt this status quo by allowing coordinated emergency response from layperson networks. We sought to understand the barriers to bystander assistance for trauma victims in Delhi, India, and implications for a laype...
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#1Veena Sriram (U of C: University of Chicago)H-Index: 1
#2Asha George (UWC: University of the Western Cape)H-Index: 26
Last. Sara C Bennett (Johns Hopkins University)H-Index: 32
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Background Medical specialization is a key feature of biomedicine, and is a growing, but weakly understood aspect of health systems in many low- and middle-income countries (LMICs), including India. Emergency medicine is an example of a medical specialty that has been promoted in India by several high-income country stakeholders, including the Indian diaspora, through transnational and institutional partnerships. Despite the rapid evolution of emergency medicine in comparison to other specialtie...
1 CitationsSource
#1Veena Sriram (U of C: University of Chicago)H-Index: 1
#2Rama Baru (JNU: Jawaharlal Nehru University)H-Index: 4
Last. Sara C Bennett (Johns Hopkins University)H-Index: 32
view all 3 authors...
: Regulation is essential to health systems and is central to advancing equity-oriented policy objectives in health. Regulating new medical specialties is an emerging, yet underexplored, aspect of health sector governance in low- and middle-income countries (LMICs), such as India. Limited research exists regarding how regulatory institutions in India decide what specialties should be formally recognized and how training programmes for these specialties should be organized. Understanding these re...
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#1Veena Sriram (U of C: University of Chicago)H-Index: 1
#2Adnan A. Hyder (Johns Hopkins University)H-Index: 43
Last. Sara C Bennett (Johns Hopkins University)H-Index: 32
view all 3 authors...
Background Medical specialization is an understudied, yet growing aspect of health systems in low- and middleincome countries (LMICs). In India, medical specialization is incrementally, yet significantly, modifying service delivery, workforce distribution, and financing. However, scarce evidence exists in India and other LMICs regarding how medical specialties evolve and are regulated, and how these processes might impact the health system. The trajectory of emergency medicine appears to encapsu...
1 CitationsSource
#1Veena Sriram (U of C: University of Chicago)H-Index: 1
#2Stephanie M. Topp (JCU: James Cook University)H-Index: 14
Last. Kerry Scott (Johns Hopkins University)H-Index: 13
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Power is a critical concept to understand and transform health policy and systems. Power manifests implicitly or explicitly at multiple levels—local, national and global—and is present at each actor interface, therefore shaping all actions, processes and outcomes. Analysing and engaging with power has important potential for improving our understanding of the underlying causes of inequity, and our ability to promote transparency, accountability and fairness. However, the study and analysis of th...
9 CitationsSource
#1Veena SriramH-Index: 1
#2Sara C Bennett (Johns Hopkins University)H-Index: 32
Last. Kabir Sheikh (Public Health Foundation of India)H-Index: 15
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The importance of strong engagement between researchers and decision-makers in the improvement of health systems is increasingly being recognised in low- and middle-income countries (LMICs). In 2013, in India, the Ministry of Health and Family Welfare began exploring the formation of a National Knowledge Platform (NKP) for guiding and supporting public health and health systems research in the country. The development of the NKP represents an important opportunity to enhance the linkage between ...
1 CitationsSource
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