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Jill E. Jankowski
University of British Columbia
ElevationHabitatEcologySpecies richnessBiology
27Publications
14H-index
1,102Citations
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Publications 27
Newest
#1Lucas I. Pavan (UBC: University of British Columbia)H-Index: 1
#2Jill E. Jankowski (UBC: University of British Columbia)H-Index: 14
Last. Jenny A. Hazlehurst (CSUEB: California State University, East Bay)
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#1Micah N. Scholer (UBC: University of British Columbia)H-Index: 2
#2Matthew Strimas-Mackey (Cornell University)H-Index: 3
Last. Jill E. Jankowski (UBC: University of British Columbia)H-Index: 14
view all 3 authors...
Tropical birds are purported to be longer lived than temperate species of similar size, but it has not been shown whether avian survival rates covary with a latitudinal gradient worldwide. Here, we perform a global-scale meta-analysis to investigate the extent of the latitudinal survival gradient. We modeled survival as a function of latitude for the separate northern and southern hemispheres, and considered phylogenetic relationships and extrinsic (climate) and intrinsic (life history) predicto...
Source
#1Micah N. Scholer (UBC: University of British Columbia)H-Index: 2
#2Peter Arcese (UBC: University of British Columbia)H-Index: 50
Last. Jill E. Jankowski (UBC: University of British Columbia)H-Index: 14
view all 5 authors...
Life‐history theory postulates that physiological traits, such as energy metabolism, can be understood in terms of allocation trade‐offs between self‐maintenance and reproduction over an organism's life span, and data show that metabolic intensity and survival vary inversely with latitude, with tropical birds exhibiting a “slow” pace of life relative to temperature species. However, tropical regions harbour strong environmental gradients of their own, and it remains to be shown whether similar l...
2 CitationsSource
#1Laura N. Céspedes (University of Los Andes)H-Index: 4
#2Lucas I. Pavan (UBC: University of British Columbia)H-Index: 1
Last. Jill E. Jankowski (UBC: University of British Columbia)H-Index: 14
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The Shining Sunbeam (Aglaeactis cupripennis) is a widespread and relatively common high-elevation hummingbird in the tropical Andes. Despite this, there is no comprehensive record of its natural history. In this study we present our findings on the diet and territorial behavior of Shining Sunbeam at sites in Peru and Ecuador. Using radio telemetry to track and observe individuals, we examined territory size and vegetation characteristics, activity budgets, diet composition, and territorial aggre...
1 CitationsSource
#1Santiago David (UBC: University of British Columbia)H-Index: 3
#2Jill E. Jankowski (UBC: University of British Columbia)H-Index: 14
Last. Gustavo A. Londoño (ICESI University)H-Index: 11
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#1Micah N. ScholerH-Index: 2
Last. Jill E. Jankowski (UBC: University of British Columbia)H-Index: 14
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Relatively little is known about the longevity of free-living landbirds, especially in the tropics. We used mark-recapture data for birds originally banded in 2005 and 2006, and later recaptured between 2011 and 2016, to estimate minimum longevity for 20 species from southeastern Peru. The oldest recorded longevity was 10 years, 6 months for a Black-billed Treehunter (Thripadectes melanorhynchus). Another notable record was for a Russet-crowned Warbler (Myiothlypis coronata; 9 years, 2 months). ...
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#2Gustavo A. Londoño (ICESI University)H-Index: 11
Last. Julie M. Allen (UNR: University of Nevada, Reno)H-Index: 5
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: The diversity of permanent ectoparasites is likely underestimated due to the difficulty of collecting samples. Lice (Insecta: Phthiraptera) are permanent ectoparasites of birds and mammals; there are approximately 5,000 species described and many more undescribed, particularly in the Neotropics. We document the louse genera collected from birds sampled in Peru (2006-2007) and Colombia (2009-2016), from 22 localities across a variety of ecosystems, ranging from lowland tropical forest and Llano...
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#1Jeremiah Jc Kennedy (U of A: University of Alberta)H-Index: 1
#2Julian Heavyside (UBC: University of British Columbia)H-Index: 3
Last. Micah N. Scholer (UBC: University of British Columbia)H-Index: 2
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Abstract ∙ Knowledge of molt patterns and their resulting plumages is useful for aging and sexing birds and, in mono‐ chromatic species, morphometric measurements can help to discern males from females. However, these data are largely undescribed for the majority of the world’s bird species, especially in the tropics. We sought to classify the molt strategy for 10 species of Neotropical passerines during their breeding seasons and considered whether a combination of wing chord, tail length and m...
Background: This study establishes an altiudinal gradient, spanning from the highland Andes (2400 m) to lowland Amazon, as a productive region for the study of bird pollination in Southeastern Peru. The 'Manu Gradient' has a rich history of ornithological research, the published data and resources from which lay the groundwork for analyses of plant-bird interactions. In this preliminary expedition we documented 44 plants exhibting aspects of the bird pollination syndrome, and made field observat...
1 CitationsSource
#1William Godsoe (LU: Lincoln University (Pennsylvania))H-Index: 20
#2Jill E. Jankowski (UBC: University of British Columbia)H-Index: 14
Last. Dominique Gravel (Université de Sherbrooke)H-Index: 41
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1 CitationsSource
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