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Inés Ibáñez
Duke University
27Publications
21H-index
2,396Citations
Publications 27
Newest
#1James S. Clark (Duke University)H-Index: 82
#2Dave Bell (Duke University)
Last.Mike Wolosin (Duke University)H-Index: 1
view all 11 authors...
#1Regan Early (University of Exeter)H-Index: 21
#2Bethany A. Bradley (UMass: University of Massachusetts Amherst)H-Index: 30
Last.Andrew J. Tatem (University of Southampton)H-Index: 66
view all 12 authors...
Invasive alien species (IAS) threaten human livelihoods and biodiversity globally. Increasing globalization facilitates IAS arrival, and environmental changes, including climate change, facilitate IAS establishment. Here we provide the first global, spatial analysis of the terrestrial threat from IAS in light of twenty-first century globalization and environmental change, and evaluate national capacities to prevent and manage species invasions. We find that one-sixth of the global land surface i...
#1James S. Clark (Duke University)H-Index: 82
#2Louis R. Iverson (USFS: United States Forest Service)H-Index: 41
Last.Niklaus E. ZimmermannH-Index: 56
view all 17 authors...
We synthesize insights from current understanding of drought impacts at stand-to-biogeographic scales, including management options, and we identify challenges to be addressed with new research. Large stand-level shifts underway in western forests already are showing the importance of interactions involving drought, insects, and fire. Diebacks, changes in composition and structure, and shifting range limits are widely observed. In the eastern US, the effects of increasing drought are becoming be...
#1Jeffrey M. Diez (UCR: University of California, Riverside)H-Index: 22
#2Inés Ibáñez (UM: University of Michigan)H-Index: 21
Last.Timothy Y. James (UM: University of Michigan)H-Index: 44
view all 8 authors...
Phenological events, such as the timing of flowering or insect emergence, are influenced by a complex combination of climatic and non-climatic factors. Although temperature is generally considered most important, other weather events such as frosts and precipitation events can also influence many species' phenology. Non-climatic variables such as photoperiod and site-specific habitat characteristics can also have important effects on phenology. Forecasting phenological shifts due to climate chan...
#1Stephen D. HandlerH-Index: 9
#2Matthew J. DuveneckH-Index: 12
Last.Robert. ZielH-Index: 2
view all 45 authors...
Forests in northern Michigan will be affected directly and indirectly by a changing climate during the next 100 years. This assessment evaluates the vulnerability of forest ecosystems in Michigan's eastern Upper Peninsula and northern Lower Peninsula to a range of future climates. Information on current forest conditions, observed climate trends, projected climate changes, and impacts to forest ecosystems was considered in order to draw conclusions on climate change vulnerability. Upland spruce-...
#1Cascade J. B. Sorte (University of Massachusetts Boston)H-Index: 22
#2Inés Ibáñez (UM: University of Michigan)H-Index: 21
Last.Jeffrey S. Dukes (Purdue University)H-Index: 47
view all 11 authors...
Climate change and biological invasions are primary threats to global biodiversity that may interact in the future. To date, the hypothesis that climate change will favour non-native species has been examined exclusively through local comparisons of single or few species. Here, we take a meta-analytical approach to broadly evaluate whether non-native species are poised to respond more positively than native species to future climatic conditions. We compiled a database of studies in aquatic and t...
#1Jeffrey M. Diez (UM: University of Michigan)H-Index: 22
#2Inés Ibáñez (UM: University of Michigan)H-Index: 21
Last.David W. Inouye (UMD: University of Maryland, College Park)H-Index: 47
view all 8 authors...
Shifts in species phenology in response to climate change have wide-ranging consequences for ecological systems. However, significant variability in species responses, together with limited data, frustrates efforts to forecast the consequences of ongoing phenological changes. Herein, we use a case study of three North American plant communities to explore the implications of variability across levels of organisation (within and among species, and among communities) for forecasting responses to c...
#1Jeffrey M. Diez (ETH Zurich)H-Index: 22
#2Carla M. D'Antonio (UCSB: University of California, Santa Barbara)H-Index: 52
Last.Luke P. Miller (NU: Northeastern University)H-Index: 19
view all 13 authors...
Extreme climatic events (ECEs) – such as unusual heat waves, hurricanes, floods, and droughts – can dramatically affect ecological and evolutionary processes, and these events are projected to become more frequent and more intense with ongoing climate change. However, the implications of ECEs for biological invasions remain poorly understood. Using concepts and empirical evidence from invasion ecology, we identify mechanisms by which ECEs may influence the invasion process, from initial introduc...
#1Bethany A. Bradley (UMass: University of Massachusetts Amherst)H-Index: 30
#2Dana M. Blumenthal (USDA: United States Department of Agriculture)H-Index: 34
Last.Julian D. Olden (UW: University of Washington)H-Index: 69
view all 12 authors...
Many non-native plants in the US have become problematic invaders of native and managed ecosystems, but a new generation of invasive species may be at our doorstep. Here, we review trends in the horticultural trade and invasion patterns of previously introduced species and show that novel species introductions from emerging horticultural trade partners are likely to rapidly increase invasion risk. At the same time, climate change and water restrictions are increasing demand for new types of spec...
#1Montserrat VilàH-Index: 56
#2Inés Ibáñez (UM: University of Michigan)H-Index: 21
Biological invasions and changes in land-use are two components of global change affecting biodiversity worldwide. There is overriding evidence that invasions can dramatically change the landscape and that particular land-use types facilitate invasions. Still, these issues have not formally percolated into risk analysis of biological invasions, and only recently has the influence of the surrounding landscape on invasive species spread started to be considered. In this paper we review the literat...
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