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H. Henrik Ehrsson
Karolinska Institutet
19Publications
15H-index
3,598Citations
Publications 19
Newest
Precise knowledge of one’s limbs’ position in space is fundamental for goal-directed action. The brain’s representation of the body in space is thought to be generated through a process of multisensory integration of visual, tactile and proprioceptive signals. In this study, we devised a setup that allowed us to displace participants’ right hand without their subjective awareness. We accomplished this task by instructing the participants to view a live video feed of their hand from the first-per...
#1Andreas Kalckert (KI: Karolinska Institutet)H-Index: 7
#2H. Henrik Ehrsson (KI: Karolinska Institutet)H-Index: 15
The rubber hand illusion is a perceptual illusion whereby a model hand is perceived as part of one’s own body. This illusion has been extensively studied, but little is known about the temporal evolution of this perceptual phenomenon, i.e., how long it takes until participants start to experience ownership over the model hand. In the present study, we investigated a version of the rubber hand experiment based on finger movements and measured the average onset time in active and passive movement ...
#1Arvid Guterstam (KI: Karolinska Institutet)H-Index: 10
#2Hugo Zeberg (KI: Karolinska Institutet)H-Index: 7
Last.H. Henrik Ehrsson (KI: Karolinska Institutet)H-Index: 15
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Abstract To accurately localize our limbs and guide movements toward external objects, the brain must represent the body and its surrounding (peripersonal) visual space. Specific multisensory neurons encode peripersonal space in the monkey brain, and neurobehavioral studies have suggested the existence of a similar representation in humans. However, because peripersonal space lacks a distinct perceptual correlate, its involvement in spatial and bodily perception remains unclear. Here, we show th...
#1Arvid GuterstamH-Index: 10
Last.H. Henrik EhrssonH-Index: 15
view all 3 authors...
What is it like to be invisible? This question has long fascinated man and has been the central theme of many classic literary works. Recent advances in materials science suggest that invisibility cloaking of the human body may be possible in the not-so-distant future. However, it remains unknown how invisibility affects body perception and embodied cognition. To address these questions, we developed a perceptual illusion of having an entire invisible body. Through a series of experiments, we ch...
#1Shunjiro MoizumiH-Index: 4
#2Shigeru KitazawaH-Index: 29
Last.Daichi NozakiH-Index: 27
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#1Andreas Kalckert (KI: Karolinska Institutet)H-Index: 7
#2H. Henrik Ehrsson (KI: Karolinska Institutet)H-Index: 15
Abstract The rubber hand illusion is a perceptual illusion in which a model hand is experienced as part of one’s own body. In the present study we directly compared the classical illusion, based on visuotactile stimulation, with a rubber hand illusion based on active and passive movements. We examined the question of which combinations of sensory and motor cues are the most potent in inducing the illusion by subjective ratings and an objective measure (proprioceptive drift). In particular, we we...
#1Andreas Kalckert (KI: Karolinska Institutet)H-Index: 7
#2H. Henrik Ehrsson (KI: Karolinska Institutet)H-Index: 15
During voluntary hand movement, we sense that we generate the movement and that the hand is a part of our body. These feelings of control over bodily actions, or the sense of agency, and the ownership of body parts are two fundamental aspects of the way we consciously experience our bodies. However, little is known about how these processes are functionally linked. Here, we introduce a version of the rubber hand illusion in which participants control the movements of the index finger of a model ...
#1Björn van der Hoort (KI: Karolinska Institutet)H-Index: 4
#2Arvid Guterstam (KI: Karolinska Institutet)H-Index: 10
Last.H. Henrik Ehrsson (KI: Karolinska Institutet)H-Index: 15
view all 3 authors...
A classical question in philosophy and psychology is if the sense of one's body influences how one visually perceives the world. Several theoreticians have suggested that our own body serves as a fundamental reference in visual perception of sizes and distances, although compelling experimental evidence for this hypothesis is lacking. In contrast, modern textbooks typically explain the perception of object size and distance by the combination of information from different visual cues. Here, we d...
#1Arvid Guterstam (KI: Karolinska Institutet)H-Index: 10
#2Valeria I. Petkova (KI: Karolinska Institutet)H-Index: 10
Last.H. Henrik Ehrsson (KI: Karolinska Institutet)H-Index: 15
view all 3 authors...
Could it be possible that, in the not-so-distant future, we will be able to reshape the human body so as to have extra limbs? A third arm helping us out with the weekly shopping in the local grocery store, or an extra artificial limb assisting a paralysed person? Here we report a perceptual illusion in which a rubber right hand, placed beside the real hand in full view of the participant, is perceived as a supernumerary limb belonging to the participant's own body. This effect was supported by q...
#1Valeria I. Petkova (KI: Karolinska Institutet)H-Index: 10
#2H. Henrik Ehrsson (KI: Karolinska Institutet)H-Index: 15
Feeling touch on a body part is paradigmatically considered to require stimulation of tactile afferents from the body part in question, at least in healthy non-synaesthetic individuals. In contrast to this view, we report a perceptual illusion where people experience “phantom touches” on a right rubber hand when they see it brushed simultaneously with brushes applied to their left hand. Such illusory duplication and transfer of touch from the left to the right hand was only elicited when a homol...
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