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H. Henrik Ehrsson
Karolinska Institutet
PsychologyProprioceptionCognitive psychologyIllusionPerception
18Publications
15H-index
3,422Citations
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Publications 13
Newest
#1Konstantina Kilteni (KI: Karolinska Institutet)H-Index: 11
#2H. Henrik Ehrsson (KI: Karolinska Institutet)H-Index: 15
Since the early 1970s, numerous behavioral studies have shown that self-generated touch feels less intense than the same touch applied externally. Computational motor control theories have suggested that cerebellar internal models predict the somatosensory consequences of our movements and that these predictions attenuate the perception of the actual touch. Despite this influential theoretical framework, little is known about the neural basis of this predictive attenuation. This is due to the li...
3 CitationsSource
#1Konstantina Kilteni (KI: Karolinska Institutet)H-Index: 11
#2Christian Houborg (KI: Karolinska Institutet)H-Index: 1
Last. H. Henrik Ehrsson (KI: Karolinska Institutet)H-Index: 15
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Self-generated touch feels less intense and less ticklish than identical externally generated touch. This somatosensory attenuation occurs because the brain predicts the tactile consequences of our self-generated movements. To produce attenuation, the tactile predictions need to be time-locked to the movement, but how the brain maintains this temporal tuning remains unknown. Using a bimanual self-touch paradigm, we demonstrate that people can rapidly unlearn to attenuate touch immediately after ...
4 CitationsSource
#1Konstantina Kilteni (KI: Karolinska Institutet)H-Index: 11
#2Patrick Engeler (KI: Karolinska Institutet)H-Index: 1
Last. H. Henrik Ehrsson (KI: Karolinska Institutet)H-Index: 37
view all 3 authors...
A self-generated touch feels less intense than an external touch of the exact same intensity. According to a prevalent computational theory of motor control, this attenuation occurs because the brain uses internal forward models to predict the somatosensory consequences of our movements using a copy of the motor command, i.e., the efference copy. These tactile predictions are then used to suppress the perceived intensity of the actual tactile feedback. Despite being highly influential, the core ...
2 CitationsSource
#1Björn van der Hoort (KI: Karolinska Institutet)H-Index: 4
#2Maria Reingardt (KI: Karolinska Institutet)H-Index: 1
Last. H. Henrik Ehrsson (KI: Karolinska Institutet)H-Index: 37
view all 3 authors...
4 CitationsSource
Self-perception depends on the brain’s abilities to differentiate our body from the environment and to distinguish between the sensations generated as a consequence of voluntary movement and those arising from events in the external world. The first process refers to the sense of ownership of our body and relies on the dynamic integration of multisensory (afferent) signals. The second process depends on internal forward models that use (efferent) information from our motor commands to predict an...
22 CitationsSource
#1Kelly L. Collins (UW: University of Washington)H-Index: 2
#2Arvid Guterstam (KI: Karolinska Institutet)H-Index: 10
Last. Jeffrey G. Ojemann (UW: University of Washington)H-Index: 54
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Replacing the function of a missing or paralyzed limb with a prosthetic device that acts and feels like one’s own limb is a major goal in applied neuroscience. Recent studies in nonhuman primates have shown that motor control and sensory feedback can be achieved by connecting sensors in a robotic arm to electrodes implanted in the brain. However, it remains unknown whether electrical brain stimulation can be used to create a sense of ownership of an artificial limb. In this study on two human su...
34 CitationsSource
#1Arvid Guterstam (KI: Karolinska Institutet)H-Index: 10
#2Malin Björnsdotter (KI: Karolinska Institutet)H-Index: 12
Last. H. Henrik Ehrsson (KI: Karolinska Institutet)H-Index: 37
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SUMMARY The senses of owning a body and being localized somewhere in space are two key components of human self-consciousness. Despite a wealth of neurophysiological and neuroimaging research on the representations of the spatial environment in the parietal and medial temporal cortices, the relationship between body ownership and self-location remains unexplored. To investigate this relationship, we used a multisensory out-of-body illusion to manipulate healthy participants’ perceived self-locat...
72 CitationsSource
#1Loretxu Bergouignan (KI: Karolinska Institutet)H-Index: 13
#2Lars Nyberg (Umeå University)H-Index: 81
Last. H. Henrik Ehrsson (KI: Karolinska Institutet)H-Index: 37
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Theoretical models have suggested an association between the ongoing experience of the world from the perspective of one’s own body and hippocampus-based episodic memory. This link has been supported by clinical reports of long-term episodic memory impairments in psychiatric conditions with dissociative symptoms, in which individuals feel detached from themselves as if having an out-of-body experience. Here, we introduce an experimental approach to examine the necessary role of perceiving the wo...
66 CitationsSource
The dynamic integration of signals from different sensory modalities plays a key role in bodily self-perception. When visual information is used in the multisensory process of localizing and identifying one's own limbs, the sight of a body part often plays a dominant role. For example, it has repeatedly been shown that a viewed object must resemble a humanoid body part to permit illusory self-attribution of that object. Here, we report a perceptual illusion that challenges these assumptions by d...
85 CitationsSource
#1Valeria I. Petkova (KI: Karolinska Institutet)H-Index: 10
#2Malin Björnsdotter (KI: Karolinska Institutet)H-Index: 12
Last. H. Henrik Ehrsson (KI: Karolinska Institutet)H-Index: 37
view all 6 authors...
Summary The question of how we experience ownership of an entire body distinct from the external world is a fundamental problem in psychology and neuroscience [1–6]. Earlier studies suggest that integration of visual, tactile, and proprioceptive information in multisensory areas [7–11] mediates self-attribution of single limbs. However, it is still unknown how ownership of individual body parts translates into the unitary experience of owning a whole body. Here, we used a "body-swap" illusion [1...
163 CitationsSource
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