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Deena Kemp
Cornell University
PsychologyTobacco controlAffect (psychology)MedicineSocial psychology
7Publications
2H-index
20Citations
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Publications 7
Newest
#1Deena Kemp (Cornell University)H-Index: 2
#2Jeff Niederdeppe (Cornell University)H-Index: 33
Last. Sahara Byrne (Cornell University)H-Index: 14
view all 3 authors...
Abstract Purpose Adolescents are often a target audience for disgust-eliciting antismoking messages, including graphic warning labels (GWLs) on cigarette packages. Yet, few studies have examined how adolescents attend and respond to disgust imagery frequently depicted in these messages. Methods A within-subjects eye-tracking experiment with middle school youth (N = 436) examined attention for GWLs that feature disgust versus nondisgust images. Hypotheses were based on emotion theory and previous...
Source
#1Chris Skurka (Cornell University)H-Index: 2
#2Motasem Kalaji (Cornell University)
Last. Jeff Niederdeppe (Cornell University)H-Index: 33
view all 9 authors...
Abstract Introduction Legal challenges have blocked the implementation of large, pictorial health warning labels (HWLs) in the U.S. In light of future legal questions the U.S. Food and Drug Administration may face in proposing alternative HWLs, we examined whether less restrictive HWL versions on the front of packs—smaller HWLs and/or text-only HWLs that do not include pictorial imagery—may be sufficient to promote cognitive and affective outcomes associated with smoking cessation. Methods We re...
Source
#1Sahara Byrne (Cornell University)H-Index: 14
#2Amelia Greiner Safi (Cornell University)H-Index: 3
Last. Jeff Niederdeppe (Cornell University)H-Index: 33
view all 11 authors...
ABSTRACTThe U.S. Family Smoking Prevention and Tobacco Control Act (Tobacco Control Act) of 2009 paved the way for the Food and Drug Administration (FDA) to propose nine different graphic warning labels (GWLs) intended for prominent placement on the front and back of cigarette packs and on cigarette advertisements. Those GWLs were adjudicated as unconstitutional on the ground that they unnecessarily infringed tobacco companies’ free speech without sufficiently advancing the government’s public h...
10 CitationsSource
#1Jeff Niederdeppe (Cornell University)H-Index: 33
#2Deena Kemp (Cornell University)H-Index: 2
Last. Sahara Byrne (Cornell University)H-Index: 14
view all 10 authors...
Source
#1Chris Skurka (Cornell University)H-Index: 2
#2Sahara Byrne (Cornell University)H-Index: 14
Last. Jeff Niederdeppe (Cornell University)H-Index: 33
view all 9 authors...
Abstract Rationale The United States courts have blocked the implementation of graphic warning labels on cigarette packages (GWLs). This decision was based, in part, on the premise that GWLs are unnecessarily emotional and are meant to scare rather than inform consumers about smoking's health effects. However, research in judgment and decision-making suggests these relationships are more complex. Objective In this article, we draw on several theoretical frameworks that lead to competing hypothes...
2 CitationsSource
#1Chris Skurka (Cornell University)H-Index: 2
#2Deena Kemp (Cornell University)H-Index: 2
Last. Jeff Niederdeppe (Cornell University)H-Index: 33
view all 11 authors...
Introduction:Though the WHO Framework Convention for Tobacco Control (FCTC) calls for the implementation of large graphic warning labels (GWLs) on cigarette boxes, the courts have blocked the implementation of 50% labels in the United States. We conducted an experiment to explore whether changing the size of GWLs is associated with changes in visual attention, negative affect, risk beliefs, and behavioral intentions. Method:We recruited adult smokers (N = 238) and middle-school youth (N = 237) t...
7 CitationsSource
#1Jeff Niederdeppe (Cornell University)H-Index: 33
#2Deena Kemp (Cornell University)H-Index: 2
1 CitationsSource
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