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Maxwell L. Elliott
Duke University
Dunedin Multidisciplinary Health and Development StudyPsychologyBioinformaticsResting state fMRIBiology
17Publications
5H-index
64Citations
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Publications 23
Newest
#1Maxwell L. Elliott (Duke University)H-Index: 5
#2Annchen R. Knodt (Duke University)H-Index: 12
Last. Ahmad R. Hariri (Duke University)H-Index: 74
view all 10 authors...
Identifying brain biomarkers of disease risk is a growing priority in neuroscience. The ability to identify meaningful biomarkers is limited by measurement reliability; unreliable measures are unsu...
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Abstract The global population is aging, leading to an increasing burden of age-related neurodegenerative disease. Efforts to intervene against age-related dementias in older adults have generally proven ineffective. These failures suggest that a lifetime of brain aging may be difficult to reverse once widespread deterioration has occurred. To test interventions in younger populations, biomarkers of brain aging are needed that index subtle signs of accelerated brain deterioration that are part o...
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#1Avshalom CaspiH-Index: 150
#1Avshalom CaspiH-Index: 8
Last. Sandhya Ramrakha (University of Otago)H-Index: 18
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Importance: Mental health professionals typically encounter patients at 1 point in patients' lives. This cross-sectional window understandably fosters focus on the current presenting diagnosis. Research programs, treatment protocols, specialist clinics, and specialist journals are oriented to presenting diagnoses, on the assumption that diagnosis informs about causes and prognosis. This study tests an alternative hypothesis: people with mental disorders experience many different kinds of disorde...
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#1Daisy A. Burr (Duke University)
#2Tracy C. d’Arbeloff (Duke University)H-Index: 3
Last. Ahmad R. Hariri (Duke University)H-Index: 74
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INTRODUCTION: Previous research has identified specific brain regions associated with regulating emotion using common strategies such as expressive suppression and cognitive reappraisal. However, most research focuses on a priori regions and directs participants how to regulate, which may not reflect how people naturally regulate outside the laboratory. METHOD: Here, we used a data-driven approach to investigate how individual differences in distributed intrinsic functional brain connectivity pr...
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#1Aaron Reuben (Duke University)H-Index: 9
#2Maxwell L. Elliott (Duke University)H-Index: 5
Last. Avshalom CaspiH-Index: 150
view all 3 authors...
Children at a higher risk of lead exposure develop smaller brain cortical surface area and volume, but only if they are from low-income families.
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#1Maxwell L. Elliott (Duke University)H-Index: 5
#2Daniel W. Belsky (Columbia University)H-Index: 31
Last. Ahmad R. Hariri (Duke University)H-Index: 74
view all 10 authors...
An individual’s brainAGE is the difference between chronological age and age predicted from machine-learning models of brain-imaging data. BrainAGE has been proposed as a biomarker of age-related deterioration of the brain. Having an older brainAGE has been linked to Alzheimer’s, dementia, and mortality. However, these findings are largely based on cross-sectional associations which can confuse age differences with cohort differences. To illuminate the validity of brainAGE as a biomarker of acce...
2 CitationsSource
#1Line Jee Hartmann Rasmussen (Duke University)H-Index: 5
#1Line Jee Hartmann Rasmussen (Duke University)H-Index: 4
Last. Terrie E. MoffittH-Index: 161
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Importance Gait speed is a well-known indicator of risk of functional decline and mortality in older adults, but little is known about the factors associated with gait speed earlier in life. Objectives To test the hypothesis that slow gait speed reflects accelerated biological aging at midlife, as well as poor neurocognitive functioning in childhood and cognitive decline from childhood to midlife. Design, Setting, and Participants This cohort study uses data from the Dunedin Multidisciplinary He...
9 CitationsSource
#1Adrienne L. Romer (Duke University)H-Index: 5
#2Maxwell L. Elliott (Duke University)H-Index: 5
Last. Ahmad R. Hariri (Duke University)H-Index: 74
view all 13 authors...
Objective: Neuroimaging research has revealed that structural brain alterations are common across broad diagnostic families of disorders rather than specific to a single psychiatric disorder. Such overlap in the structural brain correlates of mental disorders mirrors already well-documented phenotypic comorbidity of psychiatric symptoms and diagnoses, which can be indexed by a general psychopathology or p factor. We hypothesized that if general psychopathology drives the convergence of structura...
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#1Maxwell L. Elliott (Duke University)H-Index: 5
#2Daniel W. Belsky (Columbia University)H-Index: 31
Last. Ahmad R. Hariri (Duke University)H-Index: 74
view all 10 authors...
Abstract An individual’s brain-age is the difference between chronological age and age predicted from machine-learning models of brain-imaging data. Brain-age has been proposed as a biomarker of age-related deterioration of the brain. Having an older brain-age has been linked to Alzheimer’s, dementia and mortality. However, these findings are largely based on cross-sectional associations which can confuse age differences with cohort differences. To illuminate the validity of brain-age a biomarke...
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#1Maxwell L. Elliott (Duke University)H-Index: 5
#2Daniel W. Belsky (Duke University)H-Index: 31
Last. Ahmad R. Hariri (Duke University)H-Index: 74
view all 15 authors...
4 CitationsSource
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