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Hollister W. Herhold
American Museum of Natural History
3Publications
1H-index
6Citations
Publications 3
Newest
Published on Feb 12, 2019in American Museum Novitates 0.98
Hollister W. Herhold1
Estimated H-index: 1
(American Museum of Natural History),
Steven R. Davis14
Estimated H-index: 14
(American Museum of Natural History)
+ 2 AuthorsDavid A. Grimaldi40
Estimated H-index: 40
(American Museum of Natural History)
Bees of the family Halictidae (Apoidea: Anthophila) have three pairs of thick, bundled muscles that are circular to subcircular in cross section within the first metasomal segment, as revealed by micro-CT scanning of 16 species in 15 genera of five bee families. In nonhalictids and the basal halictid subfamily Rophitinae, these muscles are planar (flat and sheetlike), typically lying between the anterior air sacs and abdominal wall. In Nomiinae and Halictinae, these muscles, especially the dorsa...
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Published on Oct 1, 2017in Systematic Entomology 4.24
Phillip Barden6
Estimated H-index: 6
(New Jersey Institute of Technology),
Hollister W. Herhold1
Estimated H-index: 1
(American Museum of Natural History),
David A. Grimaldi40
Estimated H-index: 40
(American Museum of Natural History)
An unusual Cretaceous trap jaw ant is described from Burmese amber dated to the Late Cretaceous. Linguamyrmex vladi gen.n. sp.n. is distinguished by an unusual suite of morphological characters indicating specialized predatory behaviour and an adaptive strategy no longer found among modern ant lineages. The clypeus, highly modified as in other closely related haidomyrmecine hell ants, is equipped with a paddle-like projection similar to Ceratomyrmex. X-ray imaging reveals that this clypeal paddl...
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1