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Andrea Parriott
University of California, San Francisco
TuberculosisConfidence intervalMedicineCohortMeta-analysis
6Publications
3H-index
22Citations
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Publications 6
Newest
#1Nicolas A. Menzies (Harvard University)H-Index: 11
#2Andrea Parriott (UCSF: University of California, San Francisco)H-Index: 3
Last. Priya B. Shete (UCSF: University of California, San Francisco)H-Index: 8
view all 15 authors...
Rationale Mathematical modelling is used to understand disease dynamics, forecast trends, and inform public health prioritization. We conducted a comparative analysis of tuberculosis (TB) epidemiol...
1 CitationsSource
#1Andrea Parriott (UCSF: University of California, San Francisco)H-Index: 3
#2Mohsen Malekinejad (UCSF: University of California, San Francisco)H-Index: 10
Last. James S. Kahn (UCSF: University of California, San Francisco)H-Index: 69
view all 6 authors...
Background Contact investigation is an important strategy for maintaining control of tuberculosis (TB) in the United States. However, testing and treatment outcomes specifically to foreign-born populations are poorly understood. We reviewed literature on testing and LTBI identified during contact investigations in foreign-born populations living in the US. Methods We conducted a comprehensive search of peer-reviewed and grey literature using Cochrane systematic review methods. We included studie...
Source
#1Andrea Parriott (UCSF: University of California, San Francisco)H-Index: 3
#2Mohsen Malekinejad (UCSF: University of California, San Francisco)H-Index: 10
Last. James S. Kahn (UCSF: University of California, San Francisco)H-Index: 69
view all 6 authors...
Homelessness increases the risk of tuberculosis (TB) disease and latent TB infection (LTBI), but persons experiencing homelessness often lack access to testing and treatment. We assessed the yield of TB testing and linkage to care for programs targeting homeless populations in the United States. We conducted a comprehensive search of peer-reviewed and grey literature, adapting Cochrane systematic review methods. Two reviewers independently assessed study eligibility and abstracted key data on th...
Source
#1Mohsen Malekinejad (UCSF: University of California, San Francisco)H-Index: 10
#2Andrea Parriott (UCSF: University of California, San Francisco)H-Index: 3
Last. James S. Kahn (UCSF: University of California, San Francisco)H-Index: 69
view all 6 authors...
Objective To synthesize outputs and outcomes of community-based tuberculosis targeted testing and treatment (TTT) programs in foreign-born populations (FBP) in the United States (US). Methods We systematically searched five bibliographic databases and other key resources. Two reviewers independently applied eligibility criteria to screen citations and extracted data from included studies. We excluded studies that contained 90%). We used random-effects meta-analytic models to calculate pooled pro...
3 CitationsSource
#1Mohsen Malekinejad (UCSF: University of California, San Francisco)H-Index: 10
#2Andrea Parriott (UCSF: University of California, San Francisco)H-Index: 3
Last. James S. Kahn (UCSF: University of California, San Francisco)H-Index: 69
view all 8 authors...
Background Despite significant public health implications, the extent to which community-based condom distribution interventions (CDI) prevent HIV infection in the United States is not well understood. Methods We systematically reviewed research evidence applying Cochrane Collaboration methods. We used a comprehensive search strategy to search multiple bibliographic databases for relevant randomized controlled trials (RCTs) and non-RCTs published from 1986–2017. We focused on CDI that made condo...
5 CitationsSource
#1Colette L. Auerswald (UCSF: University of California, San Francisco)H-Index: 17
#2Jessica S. Lin (University of California, Berkeley)H-Index: 1
Last. Andrea Parriott (UCSF: University of California, San Francisco)H-Index: 3
view all 3 authors...
OBJECTIVEs. The mortality rate of a street-recruited homeless youth cohort in the United States has not yet been reported. We examined the six-year mortality rate for a cohort of street youth recruited from San Francisco street venues in 2004. METHODS. Using data collected from a longitudinal, venue-based sample of street youth 15-24 years of age, we calculated age, race, and gender-adjusted mortality rates. RESULTS. Of a sample of 218 participants, 11 died from enrollment in 2004 to December 31...
14 CitationsSource
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