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Jeremy G. Weber
University of Pittsburgh
54Publications
13H-index
833Citations
Publications 54
Newest
Abstract We study how subsurface ownership shapes the income effects of oil and gas extraction. For the average US county with growth in extraction from 2000 to 2014, we find that royalty income and its multiplier effect accounted for 70% of the total income gain, with each royalty dollar generating an additional 49 cents of local income. A county where residents own the subsurface captured 28 cents more of each dollar in production than one with absentee ownership. Nationally, oil and gas produ...
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#1Katie Jo BlackH-Index: 1
#2Shawn J. McCoyH-Index: 2
Last.Jeremy G. WeberH-Index: 13
view all 3 authors...
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Whether improved local economic conditions lead to better student outcomes is theoretically ambiguous and will depend on how schools use additional revenues and how students and teachers respond to rising private sector wages. The Texas boom in shale oil and gas drilling, with its large and localized effects on wages and the tax base, provides a unique opportunity to address this question that spans the areas of education, labor markets, and public finance. An empirical approach using variation ...
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#1Katie Jo Black (Kenyon College)H-Index: 1
#2Shawn J. McCoy (UNLV: University of Nevada, Las Vegas)H-Index: 2
Last.Jeremy G. Weber (University of Pittsburgh)H-Index: 13
view all 3 authors...
Abstract Unconventional gas development (fracking) is controversial in large part because of environmental and health concerns. We consider the concern that fracking leads to more carcinogenic radon gas in nearby buildings. Our empirical approach estimates treatment effects where treatment is continuous (number of wells) and varies in intensity (distance to the wells) and in duration of exposure (the time since wells were drilled). The approach allows any potential effect of fracking to vary non...
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#1Claudia HitajH-Index: 5
#2Jeremy G. WeberH-Index: 13
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#1Joseph Marchand (U of A: University of Alberta)H-Index: 8
#2Jeremy G. Weber (University of Pittsburgh)H-Index: 13
A primary way that natural resources affect a locality is through the demand for labor, with greater extraction requiring more workers. Shifts in labor demand can be measured through changes in employment and earnings, the main labor market outcomes, or through changes in the population and income, more generally. These changes may spillover to the non-resource economy, and their effects may be felt unequally across the population, thereby altering the distribution of income and the poverty rate...
16 CitationsSource
#1Christopher BurnsH-Index: 3
#2Nigel D. KeyH-Index: 22
Last.Jeremy G. WeberH-Index: 13
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Farmland plays a unique and important role in agriculture. Farm real estate (which includes land and the structures on it) accounts for over 80 percent of farm-sector assets. Farm real estate values reached record highs in 2015, driven by high net cash farm income and low interest rates. However, farmland appreciation has slowed considerably over the last 2 years due to lower commodity prices and lower net cash farm income, raising questions about the potential impact on farm financial stress. T...
2 Citations
To pay for environmental and public infrastructure costs associated with shale gas wells, Pennsylvania introduced a per-well impact fee despite concerns that it would discourage industry investment. Using a quasi-experimental design and data that nearly cover the universe of leases and wells in Pennsylvania, Ohio, and West Virginia, we find that leasing by energy firms declined dramatically after the fee’s enactment, but little to no declines in well permitting or drilling occurred in the most g...
4 CitationsSource
#1Claudia HitajH-Index: 5
#2Jeremy G. WeberH-Index: 13
view all 3 authors...
With the shale revolution, annual oil and gas production in the United States grew by 69 percent from 2005 to 2014, and almost 67 percent of the production occurred on farmland in 2014. The effect of oil and gas development on farm sector finances is not well understood. Limited nationwide information exists on issues such as the extent that farm operators and landlords own the rights to the oil and gas beneath their land, the value of the rights, or the timing and prevalence of leasing with ene...
#1Max Harleman (University of Pittsburgh)H-Index: 1
#2Jeremy G. Weber (University of Pittsburgh)H-Index: 13
Who owns an area's natural resources affects the local financial gains from extraction and participation in resource governance. We develop a typology of ownership regimes using two dimensions of ownership, private versus public and local versus absentee, and apply it to unconventional natural gas development in the United Kingdom (UK) and the state of Pennsylvania in the United States. We find that local residents in Pennsylvania own 53% of the acreage leased for development and capture an esti...
1 CitationsSource
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