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Andrea A. Cabrera
University of Groningen
9Publications
2H-index
21Citations
Publications 9
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#1Andrea A. Cabrera (UG: University of Groningen)H-Index: 2
#2Elena Schall (UG: University of Groningen)
Last.Per J. Palsbøll (UG: University of Groningen)H-Index: 23
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The demography of baleen whales and their prey during the past 30 thousand years was assessed to understand the effects of past rapid global warming on marine ecosystems. Mitochondrial and genome-wide DNA sequence variation in eight baleen whale and seven prey species revealed strong, ocean-wide demographic changes that were correlated with changes in global temperatures and regional oceanographic conditions. In the Southern Ocean baleen whale and prey abundance increased exponentially and in ap...
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#1Andrea A. Cabrera (UG: University of Groningen)H-Index: 2
#2Jeroen P. A. Hoekendijk (UG: University of Groningen)H-Index: 1
Last.Martine Bérubé (UG: University of Groningen)H-Index: 20
view all 32 authors...
The advent of massive parallel sequencing technologies has resulted in an increase of studies based upon complete mitochondrial genome DNA sequences that revisit the taxonomic status within and among species. Spatially distinct monophyly in mitogenomic genealogies, i.e., the sharing of a recent common ancestor among con-specific samples collected in the same region has been viewed as evidence for subspecies. Several recent studies in cetaceans have employed this criterion to suggest subsequent i...
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#2Martine BérubéH-Index: 20
Last.Per J. PalsbøllH-Index: 23
view all 12 authors...
Currently, three stocks of sei whales (Balaenoptera borealis) are defined in the North Atlantic; the Nova Scotian, Iceland-Denmark Strait and Eastern North Atlantic stocks, which are mainly based upon historical catch and sighting data. We analyzed mitochondrial control region DNA (mtDNA) sequences and genotypes from 7 to 11 microsatellite loci in 87 samples from three sites in the North Atlantic; Iceland, the Gulf of Maine and the Azores, and compared against the North Pacific using 489 previou...
2 CitationsSource
#2Martine BérubéH-Index: 20
Last.Per J. PalsbøllH-Index: 23
view all 12 authors...
#1Andrea A. Cabrera (UG: University of Groningen)H-Index: 2
#2Per J. Palsbøll (UG: University of Groningen)H-Index: 23
Inferring the demographic history of species and their populations is crucial to understand their contemporary distribution, abundance, and adaptations. The high computational overhead of likelihood-based inference approaches severely restricts their applicability to large data sets or complex models. In response to these restrictions, Approximate Bayesian Computation (ABC) methods have been developed to infer the demographic past of populations and species. Here we present the results of an eva...
19 CitationsSource
#2Martine BérubéH-Index: 20
Last.Per J. PalsbøllH-Index: 23
view all 10 authors...
Signals of past demographic changes can be found within the genetic diversity of a population long after an event has occurred. However, modern genetics is not always able to detect past demographic changes. Sometimes, signals of demographic changes are lost over time, overshadowed by other events or statistical power is insufficient to discriminate between different events. In this study we looked at the genetic diversity of the North Atlantic blue whale (Balaenoptera musculus musculus). Blue w...
#1Andrea A. CabreraH-Index: 2
#2Jon Aars (NPI: Norwegian Polar Institute)H-Index: 31
Last.Per J. PalsbøllH-Index: 23
view all 21 authors...
The glacial-interglacial transitions during the Late Quaternary effected the thickness and extent of glaciers and ice sheets as well as sea level height and ocean circulation patterns. These environmental changes altered the ecological conditions of many species both at high and low latitudes, and hence were evolution-driving forces. Here, we asked whether the Late Quaternary changes in the marine environment induced cross-taxa responses to widespread climatic stressors or whether only species-s...
#1Marc Tollis (ASU: Arizona State University)H-Index: 9
#2Lisa M. Abegglen (UofU: University of Utah)H-Index: 5
Last.Carlo C. Maley (ASU: Arizona State University)H-Index: 38
view all 10 authors...
Large body size has evolved at least 11 times during mammalian evolution, exemplified by the proboscidean( elephant) and cetacean (whale) lineages. These species should face a higher lifetime risk of cancer due to the greater probability of oncogenic mutations occurring during somatic evolution in an organism containing 100 to1000X more cells than a human. However, zoo necropsy data reveals elephants have only a 1-3% probability of death from cancer compared to 11-25% for humans. We find elephan...
#1Andrea A. CabreraH-Index: 2
Last.Per J. PalsbøllH-Index: 23
view all 10 authors...
The ringed seal (Pusa hispida) is a pagophilic seal species with a life cycle closely associated with the sea ice and also the key prey species for the polar bear (Ursus maritimus). Global warming is rapidly diminishing the extent of summer sea ice in the Arctic, greatly reducing habitat availability for ringed seals and indirectly influencing the prey availability for polar bears. Predicting the effects of climate change on the abundance of ringed seals is essential for effective long-term mana...
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