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Lindsey R. Leighton
University of Alberta
GeologyPaleontologyPredationEcologyBiology
68Publications
19H-index
1,068Citations
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Publications 69
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#1Carrie L. Tyler (Miami University)H-Index: 9
#2Darrin J. Molinaro (U of A: University of Alberta)H-Index: 2
Last. Lindsey R. Leighton (U of A: University of Alberta)H-Index: 19
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1 CitationsSource
#1Rylan V. Dievert (U of A: University of Alberta)
#2Kristina M. Barclay (U of A: University of Alberta)H-Index: 4
Last. Lindsey R. Leighton (U of A: University of Alberta)H-Index: 19
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Abstract The brachiopod order Atrypida was one of the most diverse and abundant clades of marine organisms across North America during the Silurian and Devonian. Atrypide brachiopods were active sessile suspension feeders that used their lophophores to capture food particles from the water. Within the subfamily Variatrypinae, there are two end-member morphotypes associated with either high or low energy environments. It has further been suggested shape played an important role in enhancing feedi...
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#1Brian Gaylord (UC Davis: University of California, Davis)H-Index: 33
#2Kristina M. Barclay (U of A: University of Alberta)H-Index: 4
Last. Lindsey R. Leighton (U of A: University of Alberta)H-Index: 19
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1 CitationsSource
#1Elvira A. Garcia (U of A: University of Alberta)H-Index: 1
#2Darrin J. Molinaro (U of A: University of Alberta)H-Index: 2
Last. Lindsey R. Leighton (U of A: University of Alberta)H-Index: 19
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Abstract Brachiopods of the Suborder Productidina vary in spine morphology; two end-members are (a) multiple short spines, and (b) few long spines. Although the short and highly dense spine morphology was very common, its function has not been tested. We analyzed the effects of the short spine morphology on shell stability and scour production on a moving substrate (coarse sand; a frequent substrate for these taxa), in a recirculating flume. The experiment used accurately weighted 3D-printed mod...
1 CitationsSource
#1Aaron D. Dyer (U of A: University of Alberta)H-Index: 1
#2Evan R. Ellis (U of A: University of Alberta)H-Index: 1
Last. Lindsey R. Leighton (U of A: University of Alberta)H-Index: 19
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Compaction is one of the taphonomic processes responsible for fragmenting invertebrate shells, thereby removing them from the fossil record. Studies of drilling predation intensities in the fossil record depend on equal preservation of drilled and undrilled shells. However, predatory drill holes may weaken shells, and these shells may be preferentially destroyed during compaction, thus overprinting predation signals in the fossil record. Previous studies have experimentally compacted drilled and...
2 CitationsSource
#1Steven E. Mendonca (U of A: University of Alberta)H-Index: 2
#2Kristina M. Barclay (U of A: University of Alberta)H-Index: 4
Last. Lindsey R. Leighton (U of A: University of Alberta)H-Index: 19
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Abstract Brachiopods serve as important sources of marine paleoecological data in the Paleozoic. In this regard, an ecological framework for much of North America during the Devonian is well established; however, the brachiopod communities of the Western Canada Sedimentary Basin (WCSB) are understudied. Brachiopod communities of the Late Givetian and Early Frasnian Waterways Formation of northern Alberta were analyzed to identify associations between community species composition, basin topograp...
2 CitationsSource
#1Lindsey R. LeightonH-Index: 19
#3Steven E. MendoncaH-Index: 2
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Last. Lindsey R. LeightonH-Index: 19
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#1Matthew J. Pruden (U of A: University of Alberta)H-Index: 1
#2Steven E. Mendonca (U of A: University of Alberta)H-Index: 2
Last. Lindsey R. Leighton (U of A: University of Alberta)H-Index: 19
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Abstract Size-frequency distributions are an integral part of understanding species interactions and population dynamics. Numerous studies have observed that the mode of the size-frequency distribution of fossil assemblages is shifted towards the larger size classes, relative to the mode of live assemblages, suggesting there is a loss of individuals from the smaller size fractions in fossil assemblages. The loss of these individuals is often attributed to size-selective taphonomy, however, selec...
1 CitationsSource
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