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Bin Wang
Chinese Academy of Sciences
17Publications
7H-index
318Citations
Publications 17
Newest
#1Bin Wang (CAS: Chinese Academy of Sciences)H-Index: 7
#2Tarah N. Sullivan (UCSD: University of California, San Diego)H-Index: 2
Last.Marc A. Meyers (UCSD: University of California, San Diego)H-Index: 69
view all 6 authors...
#1Bin Wang (CAS: Chinese Academy of Sciences)H-Index: 7
#2Tarah N. Sullivan (UCSD: University of California, San Diego)H-Index: 2
Abstract Keratinous materials, omnipresent as the hard and durable epidermal appendages of animals, are among the toughest biological materials. They exhibit diverse morphologies and structures that serve a variety of amazing and inspiring mechanical functions. In this work, we provide a review of representative terrestrial, aerial and aquatic keratinous materials, pangolin scales, feather shafts and baleen plates, and correlate their hierarchical structures to the respective functions of dermal...
#1Michael J. Chon (NU: Northwestern University)H-Index: 1
#2Matthew Daly (NU: Northwestern University)H-Index: 9
Last.Horacio Dante Espinosa (NU: Northwestern University)H-Index: 53
view all 7 authors...
Abstract Pangolin scales form a durable armor whose hierarchical structure offers an avenue towards high performance bio-inspired materials design. In this study, the fracture resistance of African pangolin scales is examined using single edge crack three-point bend fracture testing in order to understand toughening mechanisms arising from the structures of natural mammalian armors. In these mechanical tests, the influence of material orientation and hydration level are examined. The fracture ex...
#1Tarah N. Sullivan (UCSD: University of California, San Diego)H-Index: 2
#2Bin Wang (CAS: Chinese Academy of Sciences)H-Index: 7
Last.Marc A. Meyers (UCSD: University of California, San Diego)H-Index: 69
view all 4 authors...
Flight is not the exclusive domain of birds; mammals (bats), insects, and some fish have independently developed this ability by the process of convergent evolution. Birds, however, greatly outperform other flying animals in efficiency and duration; for example the common swift ( Apus apus ) has recently been reported to regularly fly for periods of 10 months during migration. Birds owe this extraordinary capability to feathers and bones, which are extreme lightweight biological materials. They ...
#1Yang Yu (UCSD: University of California, San Diego)H-Index: 2
#2Wen Yang (UCSD: University of California, San Diego)H-Index: 16
Last.Marc A. Meyers (UCSD: University of California, San Diego)H-Index: 69
view all 4 authors...
Abstract The understanding of the mechanical behavior of hair under various conditions broadens our knowledge in biological materials science and contributes to the cosmetic industry. The hierarchical organization of hair is studied from the intermediate filament to the structural levels. The effects of strain rate, relative humidity, and temperature are evaluated. Hair exhibits a high tensile strength, 150–270 MPa, which is significantly dependent on strain rate and humidity. The strain-rate se...
#1Bin Wang (UCSD: University of California, San Diego)H-Index: 7
#2Marc A. Meyers (UCSD: University of California, San Diego)H-Index: 69
Only seldom are square/rectangular shapes found in nature. One notable exception is the bird feather rachis, which raises the question: why is the proximal base round but the distal end square? Herein, it is uncovered that, given the same area, square cross sections show higher bending rigidity and are superior in maintaining the original shape, whereas circular sections ovalize upon flexing. This circular-to-square shape change increases the ability of the flight feathers to resist flexure whil...
#1Bin Wang (UCSD: University of California, San Diego)H-Index: 7
#2Marc A. Meyers (UCSD: University of California, San Diego)H-Index: 69
Abstract Flight feathers are unique among a variety of keratinous appendages in that they are lightweight, stiff and strong. They are designed to withstand aerodynamic forces, but their morphology and structure have been oversimplified and thus understudied historically. Here we present an investigation of the shaft from seagull primary feathers, elucidate the hierarchical fibrous and porous structure along the shaft length, and correlate the tensile and nanomechanical properties to the fiber or...
#1Bin Wang (UCSD: University of California, San Diego)H-Index: 7
#2Wen Yang (ETH Zurich)H-Index: 16
Last.Marc A. Meyers (UCSD: University of California, San Diego)H-Index: 69
view all 4 authors...
Abstract The pangolin has a flexible dermal armor consisting of overlapping keratinous scales. Although they show potential for bioinspired flexible armor, the design principles of pangolin armor are barely known. Here we report on the overlapping organization, hierarchical structure (from the nano to the mesolevel), and mechanical response of scales from ground (Chinese) and arboreal (African tree) pangolins. Both scales exhibit the same overlapping organization, with each scale at the center o...
#1Bin Wang (UCSD: University of California, San Diego)H-Index: 7
#2Wen Yang (UCSD: University of California, San Diego)H-Index: 16
Last.Marc A. Meyers (UCSD: University of California, San Diego)H-Index: 69
view all 4 authors...
Abstract A ubiquitous biological material, keratin represents a group of insoluble, usually high-sulfur content and filament-forming proteins, constituting the bulk of epidermal appendages such as hair, nails, claws, turtle scutes, horns, whale baleen, beaks, and feathers. These keratinous materials are formed by cells filled with keratin and are considered ‘dead tissues’. Nevertheless, they are among the toughest biological materials, serving as a wide variety of interesting functions, e.g. sca...
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