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Robert Stevens
Department of Education and Communities
Child developmentMental healthRecord linkageProsocial behaviorPopulation
3Publications
2H-index
20Citations
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Publications 3
Newest
#1Tyson Whitten (UNSW: University of New South Wales)H-Index: 1
#2Robert Stevens (Department of Education and Communities)H-Index: 2
Last. Vaughan J. Carr (UNSW: University of New South Wales)H-Index: 59
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Abstract Though the positive association between a connection to the natural environment and well-being is well established, few studies have examined this association in children, and none have ex...
1 CitationsSource
#1Melissa J. Green (UNSW: University of New South Wales)H-Index: 38
#2Felicity Harris (UNSW: University of New South Wales)H-Index: 7
Last. Vaughan J. Carr (UNSW: University of New South Wales)H-Index: 59
view all 17 authors...
The New South Wales Child Development Study (NSW-CDS) was established to enable a life course epidemiological approach to identifying risk and protective factors for childhood and adolescent-onset mental health problems, and other adverse outcomes (e.g. educational underachievement, welfare dependence, criminality). The study methodology entails repeated waves of record linkage for a population of Australian children in the state of NSW, funded by competitive funding awards (see Funding), and co...
8 CitationsSource
#1Kristin R. LaurensH-Index: 33
#2Stacy Tzoumakis (UNSW: University of New South Wales)H-Index: 9
Last. Melissa J. Green (UNSW: University of New South Wales)H-Index: 38
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Purpose The Middle Childhood Survey (MCS) was designed as a computerised self-report assessment of children’s mental health and well-being at approximately 11 years of age, conducted with a population cohort of 87 026 children being studied longitudinally within the New South Wales (NSW) Child Development Study. Participants School Principals provided written consent for teachers to administer the MCS in class to year 6 students at 829 NSW schools (35.0% of eligible schools). Parent or child opt...
11 CitationsSource
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