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Joseph A. Vitriol
Harvard University
PsychologyImplicit attitudePresidential electionSocial psychologyPolitics
19Publications
5H-index
80Citations
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Publications 20
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#1Joseph A. Vitriol (Harvard University)H-Index: 5
#2Erik Gahner Larsen (UKC: University of Kent)H-Index: 4
Last. Steven G. Ludeke (University of Southern Denmark)H-Index: 9
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Abstract A large body of literature has examined how personality traits relate to political attitudes and behavior. However, like many studies in personality psychology, these investigations rely on Western, educated, industrialized, rich and democratic (WEIRD) samples. Whether these findings generalize to minority populations remains underexplored. We address this oversight by studying if the observed correlations between personality traits and political variables using WEIRD respondents are co...
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#1Joseph A. Vitriol (Harvard University)H-Index: 5
#2Erik Gahner Larsen (UKC: University of Kent)H-Index: 4
Last. Steven G. Ludeke (University of Southern Denmark)H-Index: 9
view all 3 authors...
3 CitationsSource
#1Joseph A. Vitriol (Harvard University)H-Index: 5
#2Jacob Appleby (UMN: University of Minnesota)H-Index: 1
Last. Eugene Borgida (UMN: University of Minnesota)H-Index: 34
view all 3 authors...
People are better able to correctly identify the faces of individuals who belong to their own race. Research linking the cross-race effect in face recognition to racial attitudes has been limited to explicit measures and sequential presentation formats. Using a simultaneous lineup task, our results from two studies revealed a systematic relationship between explicit racial bias and increased false identification of Black faces. We observed inconsistent evidence to suggest that individual differe...
Source
#1Joseph A. Vitriol (Harvard University)H-Index: 5
#2Michal Reifen Tagar (Interdisciplinary Center Herzliya)H-Index: 8
Last. Vanessa Sawicki (OSU: Ohio State University)H-Index: 5
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Abstract Ideological orientation may provide some citizens with an efficient heuristic for guiding their political judgment. Accordingly, one might expect that ideological uncertainty would lead individuals to engage more deeply with the political domain in order to acquire a sufficient level of subjective certainty that the ideological orientation they have adopted is the “right” one. Given the inherent complexity and ambiguity of the political realm, however, we propose that ideological uncert...
2 CitationsSource
#1Christopher M. Federico (UMN: University of Minnesota)H-Index: 25
#2Allison L. Williams (UMN: University of Minnesota)H-Index: 4
Last. Joseph A. Vitriol (Lehigh University)H-Index: 5
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4 CitationsSource
#1Joseph A. Vitriol (Lehigh University)H-Index: 5
#2Jessecae K. Marsh (Lehigh University)H-Index: 9
5 CitationsSource
#1Alexander MakiH-Index: 6
#2Joseph A. VitriolH-Index: 5
Last. Mark SnyderH-Index: 72
view all 5 authors...
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#1José M. Causadias (ASU: Arizona State University)H-Index: 6
#2Joseph A. Vitriol (Lehigh University)H-Index: 5
Last. Annabelle L. Atkin (ASU: Arizona State University)H-Index: 3
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Abstract In this article, we provide evidence for the cultural (mis)attribution bias in developmental psychology in the United States: the tendency to see minorities as members of a group whose development is shaped primarily by culture, and to perceive Whites as independent individuals whose development is largely influenced by psychological processes. In two studies, we investigated this bias with a decade of peer reviewed developmental research conducted in the US ( N = 640 articles), and an ...
12 CitationsSource
#1José M. CausadiasH-Index: 6
#2Joseph A. VitriolH-Index: 5
Last. Annabelle L. AtkinH-Index: 3
view all 3 authors...
#1Dennis T. Kahn (Interdisciplinary Center Herzliya)H-Index: 3
#2Michal Reifen Tagar (Interdisciplinary Center Herzliya)H-Index: 8
Last. Varda Liberman (Interdisciplinary Center Herzliya)H-Index: 10
view all 6 authors...
In three studies across three cultures (U.S., Sweden, and Israel), we examine whether implicit theories about groups are associated with political identity and whether this relationship is mediated by Social Dominance Orientation (SDO). Study 1 found that raising the salience of entity beliefs leads to increased right-wing political self-identification on social issues, although no such effect was found regarding general or economic political identity. In Study 2, we found that the more particip...
2 CitationsSource
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