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Gidon Eshel
Bard College
17Publications
7H-index
239Citations
Publications 17
Newest
#1Gidon Eshel (Bard College)H-Index: 7
#2Paul Stainier (Harvard University)
Last.Akshay Swaminathan (Harvard University)
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Because meat is more resource intensive than vegetal protein sources, replacing it with efficient plant alternatives is potentially desirable, provided these alternatives prove nutritionally sound. We show that protein conserving plant alternatives to meat that rigorously satisfy key nutritional constraints while minimizing cropland, nitrogen fertilizer (Nr) and water use and greenhouse gas (GHG) emissions exist, and could improve public health. We develop a new methodology for identifying nutri...
#1Alon Shepon (Weizmann Institute of Science)H-Index: 6
#2Gidon Eshel (Bard College)H-Index: 7
Last.Ron Maymon (Weizmann Institute of Science)H-Index: 57
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Food loss is widely recognized as undermining food security and environmental sustainability. However, consumption of resource-intensive food items instead of more efficient, equally nutritious alternatives can also be considered as an effective food loss. Here we define and quantify these opportunity food losses as the food loss associated with consuming resource-intensive animal-based items instead of plant-based alternatives which are nutritionally comparable, e.g., in terms of protein conten...
#1Gidon Eshel (Bard College)H-Index: 7
#2Alon Shepon (Weizmann Institute of Science)H-Index: 6
Last.Ron Maymon (Weizmann Institute of Science)H-Index: 57
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Food production dominates land, water and fertilizer use and is a greenhouse gas source. In the United States, beef production is the main agricultural resource user overall, as well as per kcal or g of protein. Here, we offer a possible, non-unique, definition of ‘sustainable’ beef as that subsisting exclusively on grass and by-products, and quantify its expected US production as a function of pastureland use. Assuming today’s pastureland characteristics, all of the pastureland that US beef cur...
#1Helen Harwatt (LLU: Loma Linda University)H-Index: 6
#2Joan Sabaté (LLU: Loma Linda University)H-Index: 45
Last.William J. Ripple (OSU: Oregon State University)H-Index: 46
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Shifting dietary patterns for environmental benefits has long been advocated. In relation to mitigating climate change, the debate has been more recent, with a growing interest from policy makers, academics, and society. Many researchers have highlighted the need for changes to food consumption in order to achieve the required greenhouse gas (GHG) reductions. So far, food consumption has not been anchored in climate change policy to the same extent as energy production and usage, nor has it been...
#1Alon Shepon (Weizmann Institute of Science)H-Index: 6
#2Gidon Eshel (Radcliffe Institute for Advanced Study)H-Index: 7
Last.Ron Maymon (Weizmann Institute of Science)H-Index: 57
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Feeding a growing population while minimizing environmental degradation is a global challenge requiring thoroughly rethinking food production and consumption. Dietary choices control food availability and natural resource demands. In particular, reducing or avoiding consumption of low production efficiency animal-based products can spare resources that can then yield more food. In quantifying the potential food gains of specific dietary shifts, most earlier research focused on calories, with les...
#1Gidon EshelH-Index: 7
#2Alon SheponH-Index: 6
Last.Ron MaymonH-Index: 57
view all 4 authors...
Livestock farming incurs large and varied environmental burdens, dominated by beef. Replacing beef with resource efficient alternatives is thus potentially beneficial, but may conflict with nutritional considerations. Here we show that protein-equivalent plant based alternatives to the beef portion of the mean American diet are readily devisible, and offer mostly improved nutritional profile considering the full lipid profile, key vitamins, minerals, and micronutrients. We then show that replace...
#1Helen Harwatt (LLU: Loma Linda University)H-Index: 6
#2Joan Sabaté (LLU: Loma Linda University)H-Index: 45
Last.William J. Ripple (OSU: Oregon State University)H-Index: 46
view all 5 authors...
Numerous climate change analyses have highlighted the role of food consumption in achieving the required greenhouse gas reductions. We quantify an idealized example of this role, the greenhouse gas reductions from exchanging one food for another. We calculated the greenhouse gas savings from replacing beef, a popular high carbon footprint food, with a low carbon footprint food, black beans. The carbon footprint of beef was derived using total US consumption data from the US Department of Agricul...
#1Raymond T. Pierrehumbert (University of Oxford)H-Index: 50
#2Gidon Eshel (Bard College)H-Index: 7
An analysis of the climate impact of various forms of beef production is carried out, with a particular eye to the comparison between systems relying primarily on grasses grown in pasture ('grass-fed' or 'pastured' beef) and systems involving substantial use of manufactured feed requiring significant external inputs in the form of synthetic fertilizer and mechanized agriculture ('feedlot' beef). The climate impact is evaluated without employing metrics such as or global warming potentials. The a...
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