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Gudrun Skjerdal
Sogn og Fjordane University College
Ecological successionVegetationEcologySpecies richnessRestoration ecology
3Publications
2H-index
30Citations
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Publications 3
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#1Knut Rydgren (Sogn og Fjordane University College)H-Index: 3
#2Inger Auestad (Sogn og Fjordane University College)H-Index: 7
Last. Gudrun Skjerdal (Sogn og Fjordane University College)H-Index: 2
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Spoil heaps are the visible footprint of hydropower production, particularly in vulnerable alpine environments. Speeding up vegetation development by seeding commercial grass species has been a common restoration practice for the last 50 years, but we lack information on whether seeded species decline and allow native plant cover to develop. We visually estimated cover of native vascular plants and five seeded grass species (Agrostis capillaris, Festuca ovina, Festuca rubra, Schedonorus pratensi...
7 CitationsSource
#1Knut Rydgren (Sogn og Fjordane University College)H-Index: 23
#2Rune Halvorsen (AMNH: American Museum of Natural History)H-Index: 20
Last. Gudrun Skjerdal (Sogn og Fjordane University College)H-Index: 2
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Abstract Human disturbances in the alpine region can have long-lasting ecosystem effects because biological recovery in harsh environments proceeds slowly. As a by-product of the exploitation of hydroelectricity, surplus masses from tunnel excavations are deposited as spoil heaps in the alpine landscape. The typical management goal for such spoil heaps is that their species composition converges towards that of their undisturbed surroundings. At present we lack knowledge of the rate as well as t...
23 CitationsSource
#1Knut RydgrenH-Index: 23
#2Rune HalvorsenH-Index: 20
Last. Gudrun SkjerdalH-Index: 2
view all 6 authors...
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