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Michael Chan
The Chinese University of Hong Kong
SociologyPublic relationsSocial mediaSocial psychologyPolitics
35Publications
15H-index
516Citations
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Publications 34
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#1Michael Chan (CUHK: The Chinese University of Hong Kong)H-Index: 15
This study examines the relationship between political identification and perceived effectiveness of formal political actors and contentious political actions to influence government policy in a po...
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#1Michael Chan (CUHK: The Chinese University of Hong Kong)H-Index: 15
#2Hsuan-Ting Chen (CUHK: The Chinese University of Hong Kong)H-Index: 10
Last. Francis L. F. Lee (CUHK: The Chinese University of Hong Kong)H-Index: 24
view all 3 authors...
The use of social media has risen exponentially in Asia in the past decade, but there have been few comparative studies examining social media news engagement in the region. We use online survey da...
1 CitationsSource
#1Michael Chan (CUHK: The Chinese University of Hong Kong)H-Index: 15
ABSTRACTDrawing from agonistic public sphere perspectives, this study examines the jamming of the Hong Kong Police Force Facebook Page by users from its establishment in October 2015 to March 2016. 203 posts accounting for 96,791 comments were analyzed using a mixed-method approach. Findings showed that the early posts were heavily jammed with three types of counterpublic comments: (1) calls for justice regarding alleged police brutality during the Umbrella Movement one year prior, (2) emotional...
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#1Michael Chan (CUHK: The Chinese University of Hong Kong)H-Index: 15
Abstract This study examined the relationships among different smartphone uses (i.e. voice, email, SMS, Facebook, WhatsApp), perceived relationship quality and subjective well-being (SWB). Results showed that face-to-face communications and friendship satisfaction were related to psychological well-being and positive emotions across all age cohorts. Mobile voice was related to friendship satisfaction and social support for the older cohorts (35–54 and 55–70+); but also to more negative emotions ...
11 CitationsSource
#1Paul S.N. Lee (Hang Seng Management College)H-Index: 12
#2Clement Y. K. So (CUHK: The Chinese University of Hong Kong)H-Index: 11
Last. Michael Chan (CUHK: The Chinese University of Hong Kong)H-Index: 15
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Abstract Social media, as a subaltern public sphere (Fraser, 1990), have a democratic function in providing an alternative platform for minorities and marginalized to defy mainstream discourses in the public sphere. However, social media have been found to have an echo chamber effect, which may be detrimental to democracy. They may help to accelerate the ascendancy of a “post-truth” era in which objective facts are less influential in shaping public opinion than appeals to emotion and personal b...
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#1Michael Chan (CUHK: The Chinese University of Hong Kong)H-Index: 15
Abstract This study examined the relationship between multimodal connectedness (i.e. communicating with others through multiple digital channels) and subjective well-being. Analyses from a serial mediation model showed no direct relationship, but there were several significant mediating pathways through individual social capital, civic engagement and positive affect. Further analyses of three age cohorts (18–34, 35–54, 55–70+) demonstrated two significant indirect pathways for the 18–34 cohort, ...
3 CitationsSource
#1Michael Chan (CUHK: The Chinese University of Hong Kong)H-Index: 15
High identifiers to political parties are typically the most cognitively and behaviorally engaged during elections. Using a national postelection survey of voters (N = 924) in the 2016 Hong Kong Legislative Council Election, the present study examined the relationship between partisan strength and a variety of social media behaviors. Findings showed that partisan strength was positively associated with social media use during the campaign. However, the relationships were generally only significa...
1 CitationsSource
#1Michael Chan (CUHK: The Chinese University of Hong Kong)H-Index: 15
This study examines citizens’ willingness to publicly express support for a political party or candidate face-to-face and on Facebook during an election. Findings from a survey showed that fear of social isolation (FSI) exhibited a negative indirect effect on public expression about the election through willingness to self-censor (WTSC) for both communication environments. The indirect effect through WTSC was contingent on perceived political disagreement within homophilous peer networks contrib...
8 CitationsSource
#1Michael Chan (CUHK: The Chinese University of Hong Kong)H-Index: 15
#2Hsuan-Ting Chen (CUHK: The Chinese University of Hong Kong)H-Index: 10
Last. Francis L. F. Lee (CUHK: The Chinese University of Hong Kong)H-Index: 24
view all 3 authors...
The Asia-Pacific constitutes the fastest growing region in mobile and social media penetration. Yet, the political implications of the technologies are not fully understood. Using probability samples of university students in Taiwan, Hong Kong, and China, this study examines the roles of mobile and social media news in offline and online political participation. Consistent with the O-S-R-O-R model (Orientations–Stimulus–Reasoning–Orientations–Response), which derives from communication and cogni...
10 CitationsSource
#1Francis F. L. Lee (CUHK: The Chinese University of Hong Kong)H-Index: 1
#2Michael Chan (CUHK: The Chinese University of Hong Kong)H-Index: 15
Last. Rasmus Kleis Nielsen (University of Oxford)H-Index: 21
view all 6 authors...
This report presents an analysis of data from a survey of online news users in seven markets in the Asia-Pacific region: Hong Kong, Taiwan, Singapore, Malaysia, Japan, South Korea, and Australia. It is based on data from the 2017 Reuters Institute Digital News Report but the regional focus provides more detailed analysis of developments across Asia-Pacific markets. To shed light both on similarities and differences within the region and between the region and more global trends, we include the U...
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