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Christienne G. Damatac
Radboud University Nijmegen
NeuroscienceWorking memoryDorsolateral prefrontal cortexBioinformaticsBiology
6Publications
3H-index
32Citations
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Publications 7
Newest
#1Christienne G. Damatac (Radboud University Nijmegen)H-Index: 3
#2Marcel P. Zwiers (Radboud University Nijmegen)H-Index: 38
Last. Emma Sprooten (Radboud University Nijmegen)H-Index: 27
view all 13 authors...
Attention-deficit/hyperactivity disorder (ADHD) is a neurodevelopmental disorder characterized by age-inappropriate levels of inattention and/or hyperactivity-impulsivity. ADHD has been related to differences in white matter microstructure, measured by diffusion-weighted imaging (DWI) and quantified by fractional anisotropy (FA). In the largest DWI analysis of ADHD to date, we systematically investigated if FA is associated with: current and lifetime diagnosis, categorical diagnosis and continuo...
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#1Michael P. MilhamH-Index: 84
#2Christopher I. Petkov (Newcastle University)H-Index: 26
Last. Rogier B. Mars (UPenn: University of Pennsylvania)
view all 141 authors...
Nonhuman primate neuroimaging is on the cusp of a transformation, much in the same way its human counterpart was in 2010, when the Human Connectome Project was launched to accelerate progress. Inspired by an open data-sharing initiative, the global community recently met and, in this article, breaks through obstacles to define its ambitions.
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#1Michael P. Milham (MIND Institute)H-Index: 84
#2Lei Ai (MIND Institute)H-Index: 1
Last. Charles E. Schroeder (Columbia University)H-Index: 72
view all 70 authors...
Non-human primate neuroimaging is a rapidly growing area of research that promises to transform and scale translational and cross-species comparative neuroscience. Unfortunately, the technological and methodological advances of the past two decades have outpaced the accrual of data, which is particularly challenging given the relatively few centers that have the necessary facilities and capabilities. The PRIMatE Data Exchange (PRIME-DE) addresses this challenge by aggregating independently acqui...
22 CitationsSource
#1Nicholas A. Upright (ISMMS: Icahn School of Medicine at Mount Sinai)H-Index: 1
#2Stephen W. Brookshire (ISMMS: Icahn School of Medicine at Mount Sinai)H-Index: 1
Last. Mark G. Baxter (ISMMS: Icahn School of Medicine at Mount Sinai)H-Index: 53
view all 9 authors...
We used inhibitory DREADDs (designer receptors exclusively activated by designer drugs) to reversibly disrupt dorsolateral prefrontal cortex (dlPFC) function in male rhesus monkeys. Monkeys were tested on a spatial delayed response task to assess working memory function after intramuscular injection of either clozapine-N-oxide (CNO) or vehicle. CNO injections given before DREADD transduction were without effect on behavior. rAAV5/hSyn-hM4Di-mCherry was injected bilaterally into the dlPFC of five...
6 CitationsSource
#2Marcel P. ZwiersH-Index: 38
Last. Emma SprootenH-Index: 27
view all 6 authors...
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#1Michael P. Milham (MIND Institute)H-Index: 84
#2Lei Ai (MIND Institute)H-Index: 5
Last. Charles E. Schroeder (Columbia University)H-Index: 72
view all 40 authors...
Non-human primate neuroimaging is a rapidly growing area of research that promises to transform and scale translational and cross-species comparative neuroscience. Unfortunately, the technological and methodological advances of the past two decades have outpaced the accrual of data, which is particularly challenging given the relatively few centers that have the necessary facilities and capabilities. The PRIMate Data Exchange (PRIME-DE) addresses this challenge by aggregating independently acqui...
4 CitationsSource
#1Jamie Nagy (ISMMS: Icahn School of Medicine at Mount Sinai)H-Index: 2
#2Christienne G. Damatac (ISMMS: Icahn School of Medicine at Mount Sinai)H-Index: 3
Last. Paula L. Croxson (ISMMS: Icahn School of Medicine at Mount Sinai)H-Index: 15
view all 5 authors...
Here we assessed whether higher cognitive function differed between male and female rhesus monkeys using tests of episodic memory and strategy implementation. We did not find any difference between males and females on behavioral performance or on analyses of grey matter volume of key regions. Our findings suggest that, at least where higher cognitive function in healthy monkeys is concerned, the sexes may not differ.
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