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Yoan Diekmann
University College London
GenePopulationGeneticsGene duplicationBiology
33Publications
10H-index
678Citations
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Publications 36
Newest
#1John R. Stewart (BU: Bournemouth University)H-Index: 23
#2Oxala García‐Rodríguez (BU: Bournemouth University)H-Index: 1
Last. Yoan Diekmann (UCL: University College London)H-Index: 10
view all 7 authors...
Abstract The prevailing explanation for Neanderthal body form is the cold (glacial) adaptation hypothesis. However, palaeoecological associations appear to indicate a less cold woodland environment. Under such conditions, encounter and ambush (rather than pursuit) hunting – and thus muscular power and sprint (rather than endurance) capacity – would have been favoured. We hypothesise that the highly muscular Neanderthal body form reflects an adaptation to hunting conditions rather than cold, and ...
3 CitationsSource
#1Rick SchultingH-Index: 23
#2Thomas C. BoothH-Index: 14
Last. Sophy CharltonH-Index: 6
view all 13 authors...
Papers are available 12 months after publication and can be downloaded free of charge, without registration after this period. The attached file is the published pdf.
#1Matteo FumagalliH-Index: 30
#2Stéphane M. Camus (UCL: University College London)H-Index: 3
Last. Frances M. Brodsky (UCL: University College London)H-Index: 54
view all 15 authors...
When we eat carbohydrates, they are digested into sugars that circulate in the blood to provide energy for the brain and other parts of the body. But too much blood sugar can be poisonous. The body regulates blood sugar balance using the hormone insulin, which triggers the removal of sugar from the blood into muscle and fat cells. This removal process involves a pore in membranes at the surface of muscle and fat tissue, called a glucose transporter, through which the sugar molecules can pass. Du...
3 CitationsSource
#1Selina Brace (Natural History Museum)H-Index: 12
#2Yoan Diekmann (UCL: University College London)H-Index: 10
Last. Ian Barnes (Natural History Museum)H-Index: 37
view all 27 authors...
In the version of this Article originally published, there were errors in the colour ordering of the legend in Fig. 5b, and in the positions of the target and surrogate populations in Fig. 5c. This has now been corrected. The conclusions of the study are in no way affected. The errors have been corrected in the HTML and PDF versions of the article.
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#1Emilia M. Pinto (St. Jude Children's Research Hospital)H-Index: 15
Last. Gerard P. Zambetti (St. Jude Children's Research Hospital)H-Index: 47
view all 12 authors...
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#1Selina Brace (Natural History Museum)H-Index: 12
#2Yoan Diekmann (UCL: University College London)H-Index: 10
Last. Ian Barnes (Natural History Museum)H-Index: 37
view all 27 authors...
The roles of migration, admixture and acculturation in the European transition to farming have been debated for over 100 years. Genome-wide ancient DNA studies indicate predominantly Aegean ancestry for continental Neolithic farmers, but also variable admixture with local Mesolithic hunter-gatherers. Neolithic cultures first appear in Britain circa 4000 bc, a millennium after they appeared in adjacent areas of continental Europe. The pattern and process of this delayed British Neolithic transiti...
7 CitationsSource
#1Matteo FumagalliH-Index: 30
#2Stéphane M. Camus (UCL: University College London)H-Index: 3
Last. Frances M. Brodsky (UCL: University College London)H-Index: 54
view all 15 authors...
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#1Maya HooleH-Index: 1
#2Alison SheridanH-Index: 12
Last. Derek HamiltonH-Index: 8
view all 16 authors...
This contribution describes the discovery and subsequent investigation of a cist in a rock-cut pit at Achavanich, Highland. Discovered and excavated in 1987, the cist was found to contain the tightly contracted skeletal remains of a young woman, accompanied by a Beaker, three flint artefacts and a cattle scapula. Initial post-excavation work established a date for the skeleton together with details of her age and sex, and preliminary pollen analysis of sediments attaching to the Beaker was under...
1 CitationsSource
Oct 30, 2018 in BSB (Brazilian Symposium on Bioinformatics)
#1Luís Felipe I. Cunha (UFRJ: Federal University of Rio de Janeiro)H-Index: 2
#2Yoan Diekmann (UCL: University College London)H-Index: 10
Last. Jens Stoye (Bielefeld University)H-Index: 40
view all 4 authors...
The concept of maximal perfect haplotype blocks is introduced as a simple pattern allowing to identify genomic regions that show signatures of natural selection. The model is formally defined and a simple algorithm is presented to find all perfect haplotype blocks in a set of phased chromosome sequences. Application to three whole chromosomes from the 1000 genomes project phase 3 data set shows the potential of the concept as an effective approach for quick detection of selection in large sets o...
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#1Matteo Fumagalli (Imperial College London)H-Index: 30
#2Yoan Diekmann (UCL: University College London)H-Index: 10
Last. Frances M. Brodsky (UCL: University College London)H-Index: 54
view all 15 authors...
CHC22 clathrin plays a key role in intracellular membrane trafficking of the insulin-responsive glucose transporter GLUT4, and so in post-prandial clearance of glucose from human blood. We performed population genetic and phylogenetic analyses of the CLTCL1 gene, encoding CHC22, to gain insight into its functional evolution. Analysis of 58 vertebrate genomes showed independent loss of CLTCL1 in at least two lineages after it arose from a gene duplication during the emergence of jawed vertebrates...
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