Match!
Thelma I. Valdes
University of Connecticut Health Center
Surface modificationPolymer chemistryMaterials scienceIonomerProtein adsorption
3Publications
2H-index
35Citations
What is this?
Publications 2
Newest
#1Thelma I. Valdes (University of Connecticut Health Center)H-Index: 2
#2Winston Ciridon (UW: University of Washington)H-Index: 4
Last. James D. Bryers (UW: University of Washington)H-Index: 32
view all 4 authors...
An ideal surface for implantable glucose sensors would be able to evade the events leading to chronic inflammation and fibrosis, thereby extending its utility in an in vivo environment. Nafion™, a perfluorinated ionomer, is the membrane material preferred for in situ glucose sensors. Unfortunately, the surface properties of Nafion™ promote random protein adsorption and eventual foreign body encapsulation, thus leading to loss of glucose signal over time. Details of the techniques to render Nafio...
5 CitationsSource
#1Thelma I. Valdes (University of Connecticut Health Center)H-Index: 2
#2Winston Ciridon (UW: University of Washington)H-Index: 4
Last. James D. Bryers (UW: University of Washington)H-Index: 32
view all 4 authors...
Nafion™ is the membrane material preferred for in situ glucose sensors. Unfortunately, surface properties of Nafion promote random protein adsorption and eventual foreign body encapsulation thus leading to loss of glucose signal over time. Here we detail surface modifications made by RF plasma deposition to Nafion with the intent to prevent random protein adsorption while providing enough functional sites (hydroxyl groups) to bind a biologically active peptide known to induce cellular adhesion (...
30 CitationsSource
1