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John A. Harrison
Washington State University Vancouver
85Publications
27H-index
4,828Citations
Publications 85
Newest
#1Kaitlin R. Perkins (Washington State University Vancouver)
#2Gretchen Rollwagen-Bollens (Washington State University Vancouver)H-Index: 12
Last.John A. Harrison (Washington State University Vancouver)H-Index: 27
view all 4 authors...
AbstractPerkins KR, Rollwagen-Bollens G, Bollens SM, Harrison JA. 2019. Variability in the vertical distribution of chlorophyll in a spill-managed temperate reservoir. Lake Reserve Manage. XX:XX–XX.Phytoplankton form the base of pelagic food webs, and as aquatic systems come under increasing pressure from environmental stressors, managers are becoming more concerned about how these pressures may result in changes to phytoplankton distribution and abundance. The vertical distribution of phytoplan...
#1Bridget R. Deemer (Washington State University Vancouver)
#2John A. Harrison (Washington State University Vancouver)H-Index: 27
In eutrophic lakes and reservoirs, reduced mixing during stratified conditions limits oxygen (O2) supply to the hypolimnion (that is, bottom waters). In the absence of an O2 supply, microbial decomposers consume alternative electron acceptors, generally in order of their thermodynamic favorability, releasing soluble, reduced manganese (Mn), iron (Fe) and methane (CH4) to the water column with implications for reservoir water quality and greenhouse gas dynamics. Still, there are very few studies ...
#1Michelle T.H. van Vliet (WUR: Wageningen University and Research Centre)H-Index: 14
#2Martina Flörke (University of Kassel)H-Index: 30
Last.Yoshihide Wada (IIASA: International Institute for Applied Systems Analysis)H-Index: 38
view all 10 authors...
Several model inter-comparison projects (MIPs) have been carried out recently by the climate, hydrological, agricultural and other modelling communities to quantify modelling uncertainties and improve modelling systems. Here we focus on MIP design for large-scale water quality models. Water quality MIPs can be useful to improve our understanding of pollution problems and facilitate the development of harmonized estimates of current and future water quality. This can provide new opportunities for...
#1John A. Harrison (Washington State University Vancouver)H-Index: 27
#2A. H. W. Beusen (UU: Utrecht University)H-Index: 32
Last.Lauriane Vilmin (UU: Utrecht University)H-Index: 7
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Understanding and mitigating the effects of phosphorus (P) overenrichment of waters globally, including the evaluation of the global Sustainability Development Goals, requires the use of global models. Such models quantitatively link land use, global population growth and climate to aquatic nutrient loading and biogeochemical cycling. Here we describe, compare, and contrast the existing global models capable of predicting P transport by rivers at a global scale. We highlight important insights g...
#1Annette B.G. Janssen (WUR: Wageningen University and Research Centre)H-Index: 11
#2Jan H. Janse (Netherlands Environmental Assessment Agency)H-Index: 25
Last.Tineke A. TroostH-Index: 2
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Algal blooms increasingly threaten lake and reservoir water quality at the global scale, caused by ongoing climate change and nutrient loading. To anticipate these algal blooms, models to project future algal blooms worldwide are required. Here we present the state-of-the-art in algal projection modelling and explore the requirements of an ideal algal projection model. Based on this, we identify current challenges and opportunities for such model development. Since most building blocks are prese...
#1Vanessa J. Rose (Washington State University Vancouver)H-Index: 1
#2William M. Forney (Washington State University Vancouver)H-Index: 4
Last.John A. Harrison (Washington State University Vancouver)H-Index: 27
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AbstractRose VJ, Forney WM, Norton RA, Harrison JA. 2018. Catchment characteristics, water quality, and cyanobacterial blooms in Washington and Oregon Lakes. Lake Reserve Manage. 35:51–63A cyanobacterial bloom (CB) model specifically developed as a screening tool for at-risk and affected lakes would benefit natural resource managers and scientists seeking cost-effective monitoring and mitigation measures to prevent blooms. We tested whether water quality, land use/land cover (LULC), and lake mor...
#1Yves T. Prairie (UQAM: Université du Québec à Montréal)H-Index: 45
#2Jukka AlmH-Index: 2
Last.Atle Harby (SINTEF)H-Index: 17
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Freshwater reservoirs are a known source of greenhouse gas (GHG) to the atmosphere, but their quantitative significance is still only loosely constrained. Although part of this uncertainty can be attributed to the difficulties in measuring highly variable fluxes, it is also the result of a lack of a clear accounting methodology, particularly about what constitutes new emissions and potential new sinks. In this paper, we review the main processes involved in the generation of GHG in reservoir sys...
#1Jake J. Beaulieu (EPA: United States Environmental Protection Agency)H-Index: 22
#2David A. BalzH-Index: 3
Last.Karen M. White (EPA: United States Environmental Protection Agency)H-Index: 6
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Reservoirs are a globally significant source of methane (CH4) to the atmosphere. However, emission rate estimates may be biased low due to inadequate monitoring during brief periods of elevated emission rates (that is, hot moments). Here we investigate CH4 bubbling (that is, ebullition) during periods of falling water levels in a eutrophic reservoir in the Midwestern USA. We hypothesized that periods of water-level decline trigger the release of CH4-rich bubbles from the sediments and that these...
#1Jeff Nielson (WSU: Washington State University)
#2Lee D. BryantH-Index: 10
Last.John A. Harrison (WSU: Washington State University)H-Index: 27
view all 6 authors...
#1Patricia M. Glibert (UMCES: University of Maryland Center for Environmental Science)H-Index: 60
#2A. H. W. Beusen (UU: Utrecht University)H-Index: 32
Last.Goulven Gildas Laruelle (ULB: Université libre de Bruxelles)H-Index: 13
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Globally, nutrient loading to surface waters is large and increasing, with sources from land-based pollution to aquaculture and atmospheric deposition. Spatial differences in amounts and forms of nutrients released to receiving waters are large, with Asia, Western Europe, and North America exporting the highest loads of nutrients, especially of inorganic nitrogen (N). Export of N is increasing more rapidly than that of phosphorus (P) on a global basis, leading to stoichiometrically imbalanced nu...
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