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Cristina Renzi
University College London
25Publications
11H-index
349Citations
Publications 25
Newest
#1Cristina Renzi (UCL: University College London)H-Index: 11
#2Georgios Lyratzopoulos (UCL: University College London)H-Index: 35
Last.Bernard Rachet (Lond: University of London)H-Index: 35
view all 5 authors...
One in three colon cancers are diagnosed as an emergency, which is associated with worse cancer outcomes. Chronic conditions (comorbidities) affect large proportions of adults and they might influence the risk of emergency presentations (EP). We aimed to evaluate the effect of specific pre-existing comorbidities on the risk of colon cancer being diagnosed following an EP rather than through non-emergency routes. The cohort study included 5745 colon cancer patients diagnosed in England 2005–2010,...
#1Christian von Wagner (UCL: University College London)H-Index: 31
#2Dorina Cadar (UCL: University College London)H-Index: 9
Last.Sandro Stoffel (UCL: University College London)H-Index: 3
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ObjectivesType 2 diabetes has been identified as a risk factor for colorectal cancer, but little is known about whether it influences participation in colorectal cancer screening programmes. This s...
#1Cristina Renzi (UCL: University College London)H-Index: 11
#2A Kaushal (UCL: University College London)H-Index: 3
Last.Georgios Lyratzopoulos (University of Cambridge)H-Index: 35
view all 11 authors...
An earlier diagnosis is a key strategy for improving the outcomes of patients with cancer. However, achieving this goal can be challenging, particularly for the growing number of people with one or more chronic conditions (comorbidity/multimorbidity) at the time of diagnosis. Pre-existing chronic diseases might affect patient participation in cancer screening, help-seeking for new and/or changing symptoms and clinicians’ decision-making on the use of diagnostic investigations. Evidence suggests,...
#1Cristina Renzi (UCL: University College London)H-Index: 11
#2Georgios Lyratzopoulos (UCL: University College London)H-Index: 35
Last.Bernard Rachet (Lond: University of London)H-Index: 35
view all 4 authors...
OBJECTIVES:To identify opportunities for reducing emergency colon cancer diagnoses, we evaluated symptoms and benign diagnoses recorded before emergency presentations (EP). METHODS:Cohort of 5,745 colon cancers diagnosed in England 2005-2010, with individually linked cancer registry and primary care data for the 5-year pre-diagnostic period. RESULTS:Colon cancer was diagnosed following EP in 34% of women and 30% of men. Among emergency presenters, 20% of women and 15% of men (p = 0.002) had alar...
#1Sara Tookey (UCL: University College London)H-Index: 1
#2Cristina Renzi (UCL: University College London)H-Index: 11
Last.Katriina L. Whitaker (RMIT: RMIT University)H-Index: 17
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‘Candidacy’ is concerned with the way people consider their eligibility for accessing health services. We used the Candidacy Framework to explore how the doctor-patient relationship can influence perceived eligibility to visit their General Practitioner (GP) among people experiencing cancer alarm symptoms. We carried out a secondary analysis of qualitative interviews with 29 women and 33 men, aged ≥50 years experiencing cancer alarm symptoms, recruited through primary care. Interviews focused on...
#1Theodosia Salika (UCL: University College London)H-Index: 3
#2Gary A. Abel (University of Exeter)H-Index: 30
Last.Georgios Lyratzopoulos (University of Cambridge)H-Index: 35
view all 8 authors...
Objective To examine how different pathways to diagnosis of colorectal cancer may be associated with the experience of subsequent care. Design Patient survey linked to information on diagnostic route. English patients with colorectal cancer (analysis sample n=6837) who responded to a patient survey soon after their hospital treatment. Main outcome measures Odds Ratios and adjusted proportions of negative evaluation of key aspects of care for colorectal cancer, including the experience of shared ...
#1Theodosia Salika (UCL: University College London)H-Index: 3
#2Georgios Lyratzopoulos (UCL: University College London)H-Index: 35
Last.Cristina Renzi (UCL: University College London)H-Index: 11
view all 5 authors...
Background We examined associations between different chronic morbidities and help-seeking for possible cancer symptoms. Methods Postal survey of individuals aged>50 years in England. Participants could report prior morbidities in respect of 12 pre-defined conditions. Among patients experiencing possible cancer symptoms we examined associations between specific morbidities and self-reported help-seeking (i.e. contacted versus not contacted a GP) for each alarm symptom using regression analyses. ...
#1Alex Ghanouni (UCL: University College London)H-Index: 11
#2Cristina Renzi (UCL: University College London)H-Index: 11
Last.Jo Waller (UCL: University College London)H-Index: 44
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Abstract Background There is broad agreement that cancer screening invitees should know the risks and benefits of testing before deciding whether to participate. In organised screening programmes, a primary method of relaying this information is via leaflets provided at the time of invitation. Little is known about why individuals do not engage with this information. This study assessed factors associated with reading information leaflets provided by the three cancer screening programmes in Engl...
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