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James White
Johns Hopkins University School of Medicine
16Publications
6H-index
562Citations
Publications 16
Newest
#1Stephen Cristiano (Johns Hopkins University)H-Index: 2
#2Alessandro Leal (JHUSOM: Johns Hopkins University School of Medicine)H-Index: 3
Last.James White (JHUSOM: Johns Hopkins University School of Medicine)H-Index: 6
view all 36 authors...
Cell-free DNA in the blood provides a non-invasive diagnostic avenue for patients with cancer1. However, characteristics of the origins and molecular features of cell-free DNA are poorly understood. Here we developed an approach to evaluate fragmentation patterns of cell-free DNA across the genome, and found that profiles of healthy individuals reflected nucleosomal patterns of white blood cells, whereas patients with cancer had altered fragmentation profiles. We used this method to analyse the ...
#1Valsamo Anagnostou (JHUSOM: Johns Hopkins University School of Medicine)H-Index: 21
#2Patrick M. Forde (JHUSOM: Johns Hopkins University School of Medicine)H-Index: 14
Last.I.K. Ashok Sivakumar (Johns Hopkins University)H-Index: 4
view all 36 authors...
Despite the initial successes of immunotherapy, there is an urgent clinical need for molecular assays that identify patients more likely to respond. Here, we report that ultrasensitive measures of circulating tumor DNA (ctDNA) and T-cell expansion can be used to assess responses to immune checkpoint blockade in metastatic lung cancer patients ( N = 24). Patients with clinical response to therapy had a complete reduction in ctDNA levels after initiation of therapy, whereas nonresponders had no si...
#1Eniko Papp (JHUSOM: Johns Hopkins University School of Medicine)H-Index: 7
#2Dorothy Hallberg (JHUSOM: Johns Hopkins University School of Medicine)H-Index: 2
Last.Yasuto Kinose (UPenn: University of Pennsylvania)H-Index: 1
view all 18 authors...
Summary To improve our understanding of ovarian cancer, we performed genome-wide analyses of 45 ovarian cancer cell lines. Given the challenges of genomic analyses of tumors without matched normal samples, we developed approaches for detection of somatic sequence and structural changes and integrated these with epigenetic and expression alterations. Alterations not previously implicated in ovarian cancer included amplification or overexpression of ASXL1 and H3F3B , deletion or underexpression of...
#1Karen S. Sfanos (JHUSOM: Johns Hopkins University School of Medicine)H-Index: 20
#2Mark C. MarkowskiH-Index: 6
Last.Ashley E. Ross (JHUSOM: Johns Hopkins University School of Medicine)H-Index: 30
view all 8 authors...
It is well known that the gastrointestinal (GI) microbiota can influence the metabolism, pharmacokinetics, and toxicity of cancer therapies. Conversely, the effect of cancer treatments on the composition of the GI microbiota is poorly understood. We hypothesized that oral androgen receptor axis-targeted therapies (ATT), including bicalutamide, enzalutamide, and abiraterone acetate, may be associated with compositional differences in the GI microbiota. We profiled the fecal microbiota in a cross-...
#1Filipa Godoy-Vitorino (Interamerican University of Puerto Rico)H-Index: 9
#2Josefina Romaguera (UPR: University of Puerto Rico)H-Index: 11
Last.James WhiteH-Index: 6
view all 13 authors...
The human cervicovaginal microbiota resides at an interface between the host and the environment and may affect susceptibility to disease. Puerto Rican women have high HPV infection and cervical cancer rates. We hypothesized that the population structure of the cervicovaginal bacterial and fungal biota changed with cervical squamous intraepithelial lesions and HPV infections. DNA was extracted from cervix, introitus and anal sites of 62 patients attending high-risk San Juan clinics. The 16S rRNA...
#1Patrick M. Forde (Johns Hopkins University)H-Index: 14
#2Jamie E. Chaft (MSK: Memorial Sloan Kettering Cancer Center)H-Index: 28
Last.Stephen Broderick (Johns Hopkins University)H-Index: 3
view all 35 authors...
Background: Programmed death-1 (PD-1) blocking antibodies improve survival in patients with advanced non-small-cell lung cancer (NSCLC) but have not been tested in resectable NSCLC, where little progress has been made over the last decade. Methods: Adults with untreated surgically resectable stage I-IIIA NSCLC received two doses of nivolumab (anti-PD-1) preoperatively. The primary endpoints of the study were safety and feasibility. Tumor pathologic response, PD-L1 expression, mutation burden and...
#1Karim Boudadi (Johns Hopkins University)H-Index: 4
#2Daniel L. Suzman (FDA: Food and Drug Administration)H-Index: 8
Last.Rana Sullivan (Johns Hopkins University)H-Index: 5
view all 28 authors...
// Karim Boudadi 1 , Daniel L. Suzman 4 , Valsamo Anagnostou 1 , Wei Fu 1 , Brandon Luber 1 , Hao Wang 1 , Noushin Niknafs 1 , James R. White 1 , John L. Silberstein 3 , Rana Sullivan 1 , Donna Dowling 1 , Rana Harb 1 , Thomas R. Nirschl 1 , Brendan A. Veeneman 5, 9 , Scott A. Tomlins 5, 6 , Yipeng Wang 7 , Adam Jendrisak 7 , Ryon P. Graf 7 , Ryan Dittamore 7 , Michael A. Carducci 1 , Mario A. Eisenberger 1 , Michael C. Haffner 2 , Alan K. Meeker 2 , James R. Eshleman 2 , Jun Luo 3 , Victor E. V...
#1Patrick M. FordeH-Index: 14
#2Jamie E. Chaft (MSK: Memorial Sloan Kettering Cancer Center)H-Index: 28
Last.Stephen Broderick (MSK: Memorial Sloan Kettering Cancer Center)H-Index: 16
view all 35 authors...
Abstract Background Antibodies that block programmed death 1 (PD-1) protein improve survival in patients with advanced non–small-cell lung cancer (NSCLC) but have not been tested in resectable NSCLC, a condition in which little progress has been made during the past decade. Methods In this pilot study, we administered two preoperative doses of PD-1 inhibitor nivolumab in adults with untreated, surgically resectable early (stage I, II, or IIIA) NSCLC. Nivolumab (at a dose of 3 mg per kilogram of ...
#1Eva Shrestha (JHUSOM: Johns Hopkins University School of Medicine)H-Index: 2
#2James WhiteH-Index: 6
Last.Karen S. Sfanos (JHUSOM: Johns Hopkins University School of Medicine)H-Index: 20
view all 10 authors...
Purpose: Studies demonstrating bacterial DNA and cultivable bacteria in urine samples have challenged the clinical dogma that urine is sterile. Furthermore, studies now indicate that dysbiosis of the urinary microbiome is associated with pathological conditions. We propose that the urinary microbiome may influence chronic inflammation observed in the prostate, leading to prostate cancer development and progression. Therefore, we profiled the urinary microbiome in men with positive vs negative bi...
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