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Amy E. Zanne
George Washington University
Woody plantEcologyXylemBotanyBiology
71Publications
29H-index
7,735Citations
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Publications 75
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#1Amy E. Zanne (GW: George Washington University)H-Index: 29
#2Kessy Abarenkov (AMNH: American Museum of Natural History)H-Index: 34
Last. Kathleen K. Treseder (UCI: University of California, Irvine)H-Index: 52
view all 23 authors...
Fungi play many essential roles in ecosystems. They facilitate plant access to nutrients and water, serve as decay agents that cycle carbon and nutrients through the soil, water and atmosphere, and are major regulators of macro-organismal populations. Although technological advances are improving the detection and identification of fungi, there still exist key gaps in our ecological knowledge of this kingdom, especially related to function. Trait-based approaches have been instrumental in streng...
4 CitationsSource
#1Brad Oberle (New College of Florida)H-Index: 9
#2Marissa R. Lee (NCSU: North Carolina State University)H-Index: 4
Last. Amy E. Zanne (GW: George Washington University)H-Index: 29
view all 8 authors...
Author(s): Oberle, Brad; Lee, Marissa R; Myers, Jonathan A; Osazuwa-Peters, Oyomoare L; Spasojevic, Marko J; Walton, Maranda L; Young, Darcy F; Zanne, Amy E | Abstract: Whether global change will drive changing forests from net carbon (C) sinks to sources relates to how quickly deadwood decomposes. Because complete wood mineralization takes years, most experiments focus on how traits, environments and decomposer communities interact as wood decay begins. Few experiments last long enough to test ...
1 CitationsSource
#1Jens Kattge (MPG: Max Planck Society)H-Index: 47
#2Gerhard Bönisch (MPG: Max Planck Society)H-Index: 24
Last. Christian Wirth (STRI: Smithsonian Tropical Research Institute)H-Index: 2
view all 728 authors...
Plant traits-the morphological, anatomical, physiological, biochemical and phenological characteristics of plants-determine how plants respond to environmental factors, affect other trophic levels, and influence ecosystem properties and their benefits and detriments to people. Plant trait data thus represent the basis for a vast area of research spanning from evolutionary biology, community and functional ecology, to biodiversity conservation, ecosystem and landscape management, restoration, bio...
17 CitationsSource
#1Amy E. Zanne (GW: George Washington University)H-Index: 29
#2Jeff R. Powell (USYD: University of Sydney)H-Index: 32
Last. William K. Cornwell (UNSW: University of New South Wales)H-Index: 41
view all 6 authors...
Abstract High-throughput sequencing (e.g., amplicon and shotgun) has provided new insight into the diversity and distribution of fungi around the globe, but developing a framework to understand this diversity has proved challenging. Here we review key ecological strategy theories developed for macro-organisms and discuss ways that they can be applied to fungi. We suggest that while certain elements may be applied, an easy translation does not exist. Particular aspects of fungal ecology, such as ...
Source
#1William K. Cornwell (UNSW: University of New South Wales)H-Index: 41
#2William D. Pearse (USU: Utah State University)H-Index: 15
Last. Amy E. Zanne (GW: George Washington University)H-Index: 29
view all 4 authors...
2 CitationsSource
#1Marissa R. Lee (GW: George Washington University)H-Index: 4
#2Jeff R. Powell (USYD: University of Sydney)H-Index: 32
Last. Amy E. Zanne (GW: George Washington University)H-Index: 29
view all 7 authors...
Source
#1Tania Fort (INRA: Institut national de la recherche agronomique)H-Index: 2
#2Charlie Pauvert (INRA: Institut national de la recherche agronomique)H-Index: 2
Last. Corinne Vacher (INRA: Institut national de la recherche agronomique)H-Index: 21
view all 10 authors...
Trees, as foundation species, play a pivotal role in the species interaction networks that constitute forest ecosystems. From the seed stage, they interact with microbial communities that affect their growth, health and fitness. Despite their eco-evolutionary importance, the processes shaping seed microbial communities in natural forests have received little attention. To unravel these processes, we analyzed the microbial communities of seeds collected in populations of sessile oak (Quercus petr...
Source
#1Christophe PlomionH-Index: 51
#2Jean-Marc AuryH-Index: 42
Last. Jérôme SalseH-Index: 39
view all 67 authors...
Oaks are an important part of our natural and cultural heritage. Not only are they ubiquitous in our most common landscapes1 but they have also supplied human societies with invaluable services, including food and shelter, since prehistoric times2. With 450 species spread throughout Asia, Europe and America3, oaks constitute a critical global renewable resource. The longevity of oaks (several hundred years) probably underlies their emblematic cultural and historical importance. Such long-lived s...
48 CitationsSource
#1Amy E. Zanne (GW: George Washington University)H-Index: 29
#2William D. Pearse (USU: Utah State University)H-Index: 15
Last. Josef C. Uyeda (VT: Virginia Tech)H-Index: 12
view all 6 authors...
12 CitationsSource
#1Brad Oberle (New College of Florida)H-Index: 9
#2Kiona Ogle (NAU: Northern Arizona University)H-Index: 31
Last. Christopher W. Woodall (Durham University)H-Index: 1
view all 4 authors...
When standing dead trees (snags) fall, they have major impacts on forest ecosystems. Snag fall can redistribute wildlife habitat and impact public safety, while governing important carbon (C) cycle consequences of tree mortality because ground contact accelerates C emissions during deadwood decay. Managing the consequences of altered snag dynamics in changing forests requires predicting when snags fall as wood decay erodes mechanical resistance to breaking forces. Previous studies have pointed t...
2 CitationsSource
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