Match!
Nicholas N. Ferenchak
University of New Mexico
Travel behaviorCrashTransport engineeringSAFERPedestrian
14Publications
4H-index
23Citations
What is this?
Publications 18
Newest
#1Nicholas N. Ferenchak (UNM: University of New Mexico)H-Index: 4
#2Wesley E. Marshall (University of Colorado Denver)H-Index: 16
Abstract Traditional pedestrian and bicycle safety analyses take a reactive approach to traffic safety by investigating crashes, injuries, or fatalities after they occur. Also examining trips that have been suppressed because of perceived road safety concerns facilitates a more proactive safety approach; however, a methodology must first be developed to estimate the number of pedestrian and bicycle trips that are suppressed specifically due to road safety concerns. To accomplish this, we examine...
Source
#1Nicholas N. Ferenchak (UNM: University of New Mexico)H-Index: 4
#2Wesley E. Marshall (University of Colorado Denver)H-Index: 16
The level of traffic stress (LTS) methodology was developed to measure, track, and improve the suitability of bicycle networks. Thanks to the simplicity of its data needs and interpretation, LTS ha...
Source
#1Wesley E. Marshall (University of Colorado Denver)H-Index: 16
#2Nicholas N. Ferenchak (UNM: University of New Mexico)H-Index: 4
Source
Source
#1Nicholas N. Ferenchak (UNM: University of New Mexico)H-Index: 4
#2Wesley E. Marshall (University of Colorado Denver)H-Index: 16
Abstract To advance healthy transportation via increased bicycling, cities combat one of the primary barriers to such cycling – traffic safety concerns – through the provision of various bicycle treatments. Shared lane markings (more commonly known as “sharrows”) are an increasingly common treatment utilized to improve bicyclist safety. While past research confirms that sharrows may effectively influence spacing and other operational measures, the impact on actual safety outcomes remains unsubst...
Source
#1Wesley E. Marshall (University of Colorado Denver)H-Index: 16
#2Nicholas N. Ferenchak (UNM: University of New Mexico)H-Index: 4
Abstract Introduction Despite bicycling being considered ten times more dangerous than driving, the evidence suggests that high-bicycling-mode-share cities are not only safer for bicyclists but for all road users. We look to understand what makes these cities safer. Are the safety differences related to ‘safety-in-numbers’ of bicyclists, or can they be better explained by built environment differences or the people that inhabit them? Methods Based on thirteen years of data from twelve large U.S....
1 CitationsSource
#1Nicholas N. Ferenchak (UNM: University of New Mexico)H-Index: 4
#2Wesley E. Marshall (University of Colorado Denver)H-Index: 16
Abstract Traditional pedestrian and bicyclist safety analyses typically examine crashes, injuries, or fatalities. However, this reactive approach only accounts for the places where people are currently walking or biking and those that are doing so. Would a proactive approach – examining areas where pedestrian and bicyclist activity is being suppressed because of safety concerns – illuminate other previously neglected safety issues? The goal of this work is to compare results from reactive and pr...
Source
#1Nicholas N. Ferenchak (UNM: University of New Mexico)H-Index: 4
#2Wesley E. Marshall (University of Colorado Denver)H-Index: 16
Traffic safety issues often impede bicyclist and pedestrian trips, preventing potential users from realizing the benefits of active transport. Traditional active transportation safety analyses, however, take a reactive approach to traffic safety, only accounting for people currently walking or bicycling by analyzing crashes, injuries, and fatalities. This begs the question: which populations are most affected by traffic safety issues neglected by traditional crash analyses? To answer this, we de...
Source
#1Nicholas N. Ferenchak (University of Colorado Denver)H-Index: 4
#2Wesley E. Marshall (University of Colorado Denver)H-Index: 16
Abstract While transportation systems have traditionally been designed to isolate different modes of travel, another developing school of thought advocates removing space demarcations, abolishing rules, and encouraging interactions between different modes. As rules are lifted, road users must become more aware of the actions of those around them. In turn, spontaneous social order takes hold. This research explores the factors that influence when a pedestrian acquiesces to a vehicle within a spac...
Source
#1Nicholas N. Ferenchak (University of Colorado Denver)H-Index: 4
#2Wesley E. Marshall (University of Colorado Denver)H-Index: 16
Background Walking for transportation during childhood has many important health and social benefits as it encourages physical activity and independence. Yet, children are often not able or allowed to safely and comfortably walk to their destinations, with traffic safety being one of the primary barriers to such active transportation in children. Every hour, an average of 40 children die on roadways around the world, most of whom are vulnerable road users such as pedestrians. Despite the unfortu...
Source
12