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Charles W. Carter
University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill
127Publications
33H-index
4,799Citations
Publications 127
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#1Charles W. Carter (UNC: University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill)H-Index: 33
#2Peter R. Wills (University of Auckland)H-Index: 21
ABSTRACT The genetic code likely arose when a bidirectional gene began to produce ancestral aminoacyl-tRNA synthetases (aaRS) capable of distinguishing between two distinct sets of amino acids. The synthetase Class division therefore necessarily implies a mechanism by which the two ancestral synthetases could also discriminate between two different kinds of tRNA substrates. We used regression methods to uncover the possible patterns of base sequences capable of such discrimination and find that ...
#1Charles W. Carter (UNC: University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill)H-Index: 33
#2Violetta Weinreb (UNC: University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill)H-Index: 12
Last.Nikolay V. Dokholyan (PSU: Pennsylvania State University)H-Index: 58
view all 6 authors...
The D1 switch is a packing motif, broadly distributed in the proteome, that couples tryptophanyl-tRNA synthetase (TrpRS) domain movement to catalysis and specificity, thereby creating an escapement mechanism essential to free-energy transduction. The escapement mechanism arose from analysis of an extensive set of combinatorial mutations to this motif, which allowed us to relate mutant-induced changes quantitatively to both kinetic and computational parameters during catalysis. To further charact...
#1Marc Potempa (UNC: University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill)H-Index: 6
#2Sook Kyung Lee (UNC: University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill)H-Index: 4
Last.Ronald Swanstrom (UNC: University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill)H-Index: 59
view all 9 authors...
Abstract Retroviral proteases (PRs) have a unique specificity that allows cleavage of sites with or without a P1′ proline. A P1′ proline is required at the MA/CA cleavage site due to its role in a post-cleavage conformational change in the capsid protein. However, the HIV-1 PR prefers to have large hydrophobic amino acids flanking the scissile bond, suggesting that PR recognizes two different classes of substrate sequences. We analyzed the cleavage rate of over 150 combinations of six different ...
#1Marc Potempa (UNC: University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill)H-Index: 6
#2S.K. Lee (UNC: University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill)H-Index: 5
Last.Ronald Swanstrom (UNC: University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill)H-Index: 59
view all 9 authors...
Retroviral proteases (PR) have a unique specificity that allows cleavage of sites with or without a P1 prime proline. A P1 prime proline is required at the MA/CA cleavage site due to its role in a post-cleavage conformational change in the capsid protein. However, the HIV-1 PR prefers to have large hydrophobic amino acids flanking the scissile bond, suggesting PR recognizes two different classes of substrate sequences. We analyzed the cleavage rate of over 150 iterations of six different HIV-1 c...
#1Charles W. Carter (UNC: University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill)H-Index: 33
#2Peter R. Wills (University of Auckland)H-Index: 21
We assemble recent experimental work on the aminoacyl-tRNA synthetase evolution into the context of theoretical studies on the nature of the problems preventing the emergence of genetic coding. What initially appeared as experimental curiosities—evidence for ancestral bidirectional coding of the two synthetase classes, the extended inversion symmetries in higher-order structure and functionality, and the strong correlations between amino acid physical chemistry and both protein folding and the t...
#1Srinivas Niranj Chandrasekaran (UMMS: University of Massachusetts Medical School)H-Index: 6
#2Charles W. CarterH-Index: 33
PATH algorithms for identifying conformational transition states provide computational parameters—time to the transition state, conformational free energy differences, and transition state activation energies—for comparison to experimental data and can be carried out sufficiently rapidly to use in the “high throughput” mode. These advantages are especially useful for interpreting results from combinatorial mutagenesis experiments. This report updates the previously published algorithm with enhan...
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