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J. Mark Eddy
New York University
18Publications
3H-index
32Citations
Publications 18
Newest
#1J. Mark Eddy (NYU: New York University)H-Index: 3
#2Dori Sneddon (HHS: United States Department of Health and Human Services)H-Index: 1
Awareness of child maltreatment as a major public health problem in the US has increased in recent years. In response, major public initiatives have been launched to fund the delivery of evidence-based programs, such as home visiting, in an effort to promote child and family functioning and health and prevent maltreatment. While promising, the number of families served by these programs remains small relative to need. Further, many families across the US are served by community-designed and supp...
1 CitationsSource
#1Jean Kjellstrand (UO: University of Oregon)H-Index: 2
#2Gary YuH-Index: 1
Last.J. Mark Eddy (NYU: New York University)H-Index: 3
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Abstract With nearly 3 million minor children experiencing parental incarceration on any given day, interest on the impact of this incarceration on children has intensified. Of particular interest is the link between parental incarceration and the development of child externalizing behaviors. While research in this area has expanded, more research is needed that examines the differential effects of parental incarceration and the heterogeneity of outcomes for children. The current study examines ...
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#1Jean Kjellstrand (UO: University of Oregon)H-Index: 2
#2Gary YuH-Index: 1
Last.Miriam Clark (UO: University of Oregon)
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Research over the past several decades has documented the effect of parental incarceration on child development. While many findings point to a negative impact of parental incarceration on children, increasingly research demonstrates the heterogeneity of children’s experiences, behavior, and eventual outcomes. Examining this heterogeneity is key to developing effective interventions that enhance protective factors while addressing especially harmful risk factors. In the current study, we used gr...
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#1J. Mark Eddy (NYU: New York University)H-Index: 3
#2Joann Wu ShorttH-Index: 22
Last.Jean Baldwin Grossman (Princeton University)H-Index: 23
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An independent, randomized controlled trial of the community-developed, multiple-component Relief Nursery prevention program was conducted with families with young children considered “at risk” for child abuse and neglect. This established program, currently operating at multiple sites in the state of Oregon, comprises an integrated package of prevention services to children and families, including early childhood education, home visiting, and parent education and support, as well as other inter...
1 CitationsSource
#2J. Mark EddyH-Index: 3
We had two primary goals when we embarked on assembling this second edition. First, we aimed to summarize and synthesize recent research on children with incarcerated parents and their families that have been conducted across a variety of disciplines, including promising intervention approaches, for a range of audiences. And second, we sought to stimulate high quality, collaborative, interdisciplinary research that will generate information needed by families, practitioners and policymakers to p...
1 CitationsSource
#1Benjamin de Haan (UW: University of Washington)
#2Joseph A. Mienko (UW: University of Washington)H-Index: 3
Last.J. Mark Eddy (NYU: New York University)H-Index: 3
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There is a significant interplay between the adult corrections system and the child welfare system in the USA through the families involved in both systems. Perspectives on the interaction between these two systems and the implications of this interaction for children with incarcerated parents are provided by three authors who have collective experience in administration, practice, and research in both systems. Issues related to policies and practices in both child welfare and corrections are di...
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#1J. Mark Eddy (NYU: New York University)H-Index: 3
#2Jean Kjellstrand (UO: University of Oregon)H-Index: 2
Last.Michael F. Lorber (NYU: New York University)H-Index: 14
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Parenting programs for incarcerated parents have become increasingly popular within corrections departments over the past several decades. The programs are appealing as they are thought to improve not only long-term prosocial outcomes and reductions in recidivism for parents who are reentering their communities after lockup, but also outcomes for their children. While some parenting programs have been shown to be effective in various ways, they may be insufficient to produce long-lasting, positi...
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#1J. Mark Eddy (NYU: New York University)H-Index: 3
#2Julie Poehlmann-Tynan (UW: University of Wisconsin-Madison)H-Index: 8
Children of incarcerated parents are an increasing and significant population, not only in the USA but around the world. An expanding body of rigorous research, particularly over the past decade, has found that children of incarcerated parents are at increased risk for a variety of negative outcomes compared to their peers, including infant mortality, externalizing behavior problems, mental health concerns, educational and developmental challenges, and relationship problems. Moreover, children w...
1 CitationsSource
#1Jean Kjellstrand (UO: University of Oregon)H-Index: 2
#2Gary YuH-Index: 1
Last.Charles R. Martinez (UO: University of Oregon)H-Index: 16
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Growth mixture modeling was used to identify distinct trajectories of externalizing behavior for youth (N = 647) across the period 10 to 16 years of age. Four trajectory classes were identified: Lo...
6 CitationsSource
#1Jean Kjellstrand (UO: University of Oregon)H-Index: 2
#2Wendy M. Reinke (MU: University of Missouri)H-Index: 28
Last.J. Mark Eddy (NYU: New York University)H-Index: 3
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Increasingly, “children of incarcerated parents” is becoming the label to describe a growing number of children with a history of parental incarceration. However, while these children and families frequently experience a variety of challenges, the web of interacting influences they face is complex. This variation makes it difficult to understand the effects of parental incarceration on children over time as well as to find solutions that help promote positive youth development for children impac...
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