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James M. Trauer
Monash University
Intensive care medicineDiseaseTuberculosisPopulationMedicine
70Publications
11H-index
616Citations
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Publications 79
Newest
#1Emma S. McBrydeH-Index: 28
#2James M. TrauerH-Index: 11
Last. Michael T. MeehanH-Index: 6
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Australia is one of a few countries which has managed to control COVID-19 epidemic before a major epidemic took place. Currently with just under 7000 cases and 100 deaths, Australia is seeing less than 20 new cases per day. This is a positive outcome, but makes estimation of current effective reproduction numbers difficult to estimate. Australia, like much of the world is poised to step out of lockdown and looking at which measures to relax first. We use age-based contact matrices, calibrated to...
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#1Gregory J. FoxH-Index: 13
#2James M. TrauerH-Index: 11
Last. Emma S. McBrydeH-Index: 28
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5 CitationsSource
#1Emma S. McBryde (JCU: James Cook University)H-Index: 28
#2Michael T. Meehan (JCU: James Cook University)H-Index: 6
Last. James M. Trauer (Monash University)H-Index: 11
view all 3 authors...
Background: Around the world there are examples of both very good and effective control (e.g., South Korea, Japan) and slower, less aggressive control (e.g., Italy, Spain, United States) of COVID-19 with dramatic differences in the consequent epidemic curves. Models agree that flattening the curve without controlling the epidemic completely is insufficient and will lead to an overwhelmed health service. A recent model, calibrated for the UK and US, demonstrated this starkly. Methods: We used a s...
1 CitationsSource
#1Adeshina I. Adekunle (JCU: James Cook University)H-Index: 3
#1Adeshina I. Adekunle (JCU: James Cook University)
Last. Emma S. McBryde (Australian Institute of Tropical Health and Medicine)H-Index: 28
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Following the outbreak of novel Severe Acute Respiratory Syndrome Coronavirus-2 (SARS-CoV-2) or COVID-19 in Wuhan, China late 2019, different countries have put in place interventions such as travel ban, proper hygiene, and social distancing to slow the spread of this novel virus. We evaluated the effects of travel bans in the Australia context and projected the epidemic until May 2020. Our modelling results closely align with observed cases in Australia indicating the need for maintaining or im...
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#1Yayehirad A. Melsew (University of Gondar)H-Index: 3
#2Adeshina I. Adekunle (Australian Institute of Tropical Health and Medicine)
Last. James M. Trauer (Monash University)H-Index: 11
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Abstract TB mathematical models employ various assumptions and approaches in dealing with the heterogeneous infectiousness of persons with active TB. We reviewed existing approaches and considered the relationship between them and existing epidemiological evidence. We searched the following electronic bibliographic databases from inception to 9 October 2018: MEDLINE, EMBASE, Biosis, Global Health and Scopus. Two investigators extracted data using a standardised data extraction tool. We included ...
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#1Romain Ragonnet (Monash University)H-Index: 7
#2James M. Trauer (Monash University)H-Index: 11
Last. Emma S. McBryde (University of Melbourne)H-Index: 28
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Tuberculosis (TB) control efforts are hampered by an imperfect understanding of TB epidemiology. The true age distribution of disease is unknown because a large proportion of individuals with active TB remain undetected. Understanding of transmission is limited by the asymptomatic nature of latent infection and the pathogen’s capacity for late reactivation. A better understanding of TB epidemiology is critically needed to ensure effective use of existing and future control tools. We use an agent...
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#1T. N. Doan (JCU: James Cook University)
#1T.N. DoanH-Index: 1
Last. James M. TrauerH-Index: 11
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#1Malancha KarmakarH-Index: 2
#2James M. Trauer (Monash University)H-Index: 11
Last. Justin T. Denholm (University of Melbourne)H-Index: 18
view all 4 authors...
Abstract Objectives The globally distributed “Beijing” lineage of Mycobacterium tuberculosis has been associated with outbreaks worldwide. Laboratory based studies have suggested that Beijing lineage may have increased fitness; however, it has not been established whether these differences are of epidemiological significance with regards to transmission. Therefore, we undertook a systematic review of epidemiological studies of tuberculosis clustering to compare the transmission dynamics of Beiji...
1 CitationsSource
#1Christian Wejse (Monash University)H-Index: 20
#1Christian Wejse (Monash University)
Last. James M. Trauer (Monash University)H-Index: 11
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#1Yayehirad A. Melsew (University of Gondar)H-Index: 3
#2Allen C. Cheng (Monash University)H-Index: 49
Last. James M. Trauer (Monash University)H-Index: 11
view all 7 authors...
The risk of a person progressing to TB disease after infection with Mycobacterium tuberculosis (Mtb) remains poorly understood, with some contacts developing TB in the early period following exposure, while others take many years to progress or never do so [1, 2]. We described profiles and patterns of contacts' progression to TB disease following exposure by linking a large, prospectively collected contact investigation dataset from Victoria, Australia to data on subsequent cases of active TB di...
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