Ming Bai
Chinese Academy of Sciences
69Publications
14H-index
493Citations
Publications 69
Newest
Published on Jan 30, 2019in Scientific Reports 4.12
Lida Xing18
Estimated H-index: 18
(China University of Geosciences),
Ryan C. McKellar12
Estimated H-index: 12
(University of Kansas)
+ 3 AuthorsLuis M. Chiappe42
Estimated H-index: 42
(Natural History Museum of Los Angeles County)
Over the last three years, Burmese amber (~99 Ma, from Myanmar) has provided a series of immature enantiornithine skeletal remains preserved in varying developmental stages and degrees of completeness. These specimens have improved our knowledge based on compression fossils in Cretaceous sedimentary rocks, adding details of three-dimensional structure and soft tissues that are rarely preserved elsewhere. Here we describe a remarkably well-preserved foot, accompanied by part of the wing plumage. ...
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Published on Feb 16, 2019in Journal of Systematic Palaeontology 2.33
Sha Li2
Estimated H-index: 2
(Chinese Academy of Sciences),
Yuanyuan Lu2
Estimated H-index: 2
(Chinese Academy of Sciences)
+ 3 AuthorsMing Bai14
Estimated H-index: 14
(Chinese Academy of Sciences)
A new subfamily of Scarabaeidae, †Electrorubesopsinae Bai & Wang subfam. nov., is described from Cretaceous amber of Myanmar (earliest Cenomanian, ∼100 Ma) as the possible sister group of Dynamopodinae. †Electrorubesopsis beuteli Bai & Wang gen. et sp. nov. is the first species of this subfamily, which has probably been long extinct. Its external morphology was analysed and compared with all known genera of Dynamopodinae. A phylogenetic analysis based on 82 morphological characters suggests its ...
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Published on Apr 1, 2019in Systematic Entomology 4.24
Jan Batelka3
Estimated H-index: 3
(Charles University in Prague),
Jakub Prokop16
Estimated H-index: 16
(Charles University in Prague)
+ 3 AuthorsRolf G. Beutel39
Estimated H-index: 39
(University of Jena)
2 Citations Source Cite
Published on Feb 18, 2019in Optics Express 3.36
Jia Qian4
Estimated H-index: 4
(Chinese Academy of Sciences),
Shipei Dang (Chinese Academy of Sciences)+ 10 AuthorsMing Lei14
Estimated H-index: 14
(Chinese Academy of Sciences)
High-resolution 3D imaging technology has found a number of applications in many biological fields. However, the existing 3D imaging tools are often too time-consuming to use on large-scale specimens, such as centimeter-sized insects. In addition, most 3D imaging systems discard the natural color information of the specimens. To surmount these limitations, we present a structured illumination-based approach capable of delivering large field-of-view three-dimensional images. With this approach, 5...
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Published on Mar 25, 2019in ZooKeys 1.08
Mengna Zhang1
Estimated H-index: 1
,
Yongying Ruan1
Estimated H-index: 1
+ 3 AuthorsMing Bai14
Estimated H-index: 14
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Published on Apr 1, 2018in Cladistics 5.88
Rui E. Nie1
Estimated H-index: 1
(Chinese Academy of Sciences),
Thijmen Breeschoten3
Estimated H-index: 3
(Natural History Museum)
+ 6 AuthorsAlfried P. Vogler54
Estimated H-index: 54
(Imperial College London)
With efficient sequencing techniques, full mitochondrial genomes are rapidly replacing other widely used markers, such as the nuclear rRNA genes, for phylogenetic analysis but their power to resolve deep levels of the tree remains controversial. We studied phylogenetic relationships of leaf beetles (Chrysomelidae) in the tribes Galerucini and Alticini (root worms and flea beetles) based on full mitochondrial genomes (103 newly sequenced), and compared their performance to the widely sequenced nu...
11 Citations Source Cite
Published on Feb 1, 2018in Current Biology 9.25
Ming Bai14
Estimated H-index: 14
(Chinese Academy of Sciences),
Rolf G. Beutel39
Estimated H-index: 39
(University of Jena)
+ 6 AuthorsBenjamin Wipfler14
Estimated H-index: 14
(Chinese Academy of Sciences)
Summary Insects use different parts of their body to cling to mating partners, to catch prey, or to defend themselves, in most cases the mouthparts or the legs. However, in 400 million years of evolution [1, 2], specialized devices were independently acquired in several groups to adopt these tasks, as for instance modified legs in mantids, assassin bugs or stick insects [3–5], or clasping antennae of the globular springtails [6]. So far, no known species used the neck region between the head and...
7 Citations Source Cite
Published on Feb 1, 2018in Cretaceous Research 1.93
Yuanyuan Lu2
Estimated H-index: 2
(Chinese Academy of Sciences),
Ruie Nie1
Estimated H-index: 1
(Chinese Academy of Sciences)
+ 3 AuthorsMing Bai14
Estimated H-index: 14
(Chinese Academy of Sciences)
Abstract Two new genera are created to accommodate two new Hybosoridae (Coleoptera: Scarabaeoidea) species: Sinohybosorus cheni gen. et sp. n. and Sinochaetodus tridentatus gen. et sp. n.. The new species are described and illustrated based on two nearly complete fossil specimens from the Lower Cretaceous (Barremian– lower Aptian) Yixian Formation of western Liaoning Province, China. A key of described species of Hybosoridae from the Mesozoic and a catalog of extinct Hybosoridae are provided. Ba...
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Published on Jul 1, 2018in Science Advances
Lida Xing18
Estimated H-index: 18
(China University of Geosciences),
Michael W. Caldwell31
Estimated H-index: 31
(University of Alberta)
+ 9 AuthorsHongliang Shi1
Estimated H-index: 1
(Beijing Forestry University)
We present the first known fossilized snake embryo/neonate preserved in early Late Cretaceous (Early Cenomanian) amber from Myanmar, which at the time, was an island arc including terranes from Austral Gondwana. This unique and very tiny snake fossil is an articulated postcranial skeleton, which includes posterior precloacal, cloacal, and caudal vertebrae, and details of squamation and body shape; a second specimen preserves a fragment of shed skin interpreted as a snake. Important details of sk...
3 Citations Source Cite
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